Tag Archives: alaska

19 Really Shocking Things You Want to Know about Earthquakes

Did you know that there are about 1.3 million earthquakes yearly around the world and that they kill an average of 8,000 people?

1. About 80 percent of all earthquakes occur along the rim of the Pacific Ocean, called the Ring of Fire, where there are 452 volcanoes or 75 percent of the world’s most active and dormant volcanoes. Natural events such as volcanic eruptions and meteor impacts can cause earthquakes, but the majority of are triggered by movement of the Earth’s plates.

2. The Earth’s surface consists of 20 constantly moving plates. The pressure increase from shifting plates can cause the crust to break, causing earthquakes.

3. There are about 1.3 million earthquakes a year. Most are 2.9 magnitude or lower.

4. There are about 10,000 earthquakes a year in California alone.

5. Earthquakes kill approximately 8,000 people each year and have caused an estimated 13 million deaths in the past 4,000 years.

6. Earthquakes are mostly caused by geological faults, but they can also be caused by landslides, nuclear testing, mine tests, and volcanic activity.a

7. Earthquakes can set off volcanoes, as was the case in the 1980 Mount St. Helens eruption and the Mount Etna eruption in 2002.

8. At least one 8 magnitude quake occurs every year.

9. An earthquake can release hundreds times more energy than the nuclear bomb that was dropped on Hiroshima in Japan in 1945.

10. Quakes on one side of Earth can rattle the other side. Scientists studying the massive 2004 earthquake that caused tsunamis across the Indian Ocean found that the quake had weakened at least a portion of California’s San Andreas Fault. The Chilean quake of 1960 shook the entire Earth for many days.

11. The deadliest earthquake ever struck January 23, 1556 in Shansi, China. Some 830,000 are estimated to have died.

12. The worst earthquake ever apparently occurred in A.D. 1201 in the eastern Mediterranean. It killed over one million people.

13. The largest recorded earthquake in the world was a magnitude 9.5 in Chile on May 22, 1960. The largest in the U.S. was a magnitude 9.2 that struck Prince William Sound, Alaska on March 28, 1964.

14. The world’s worst landslide started by an earthquake occurred in 1920 in the Kansu province in China. The landslide killed about 200,000 people, while the highest tsunami happened in Japan in 1771 generating waves as high as 85 meters or just over 255 feet.

15. Scientists think that animals may sense weak tremors before a quake. Other scientists think that animals may sense electrical signals set off by the shifting of underground rocks.

16. The San Andreas Fault is moving about 2 inches a year. At this rate, San Francisco and Los Angeles will be next to each other in 15 million years.

17. Japan’s massive 2011 earthquake shifted the earth’s mass toward the center, causing the planet to spin faster and shortening the day by 1.6 microseconds. The 2004 Sumatra quake shorted the day by 6.8 microseconds.

18. The sun and moon cause tremors. It’s long been known that they create tides in the planet’s crust, very minor versions of ocean tides. Now researchers say the tug of the sun and moon on the San Andreas Fault stimulates tremors deep underground.

19. A city in Chile moved 10 feet in the massive 8.8 magnitude earthquake Feb. 27, 2010. The rip in Earth’s crust shifted the city of Concepcion that much to the west. The quake is also thought to have changed the planet’s rotation slightly and shortened Earth’s day.

This content was originally published by teleSUR at the following address:
“http://www.telesurtv.net/english/news/19-Really-Shoking-Things-You-Need-to-Know-about-Earthquakes-20160417-0038.html”. If you intend to use it, please cite the source and provide a link to the original article. www.teleSURtv.net/english

I’ll Drink to That!

Stranded Nome man survives 3 days in cold

By KYLE HOPKINS

Clifton Vial, 52, climbed into the cab of his Toyota Tacoma Monday night in Nome to see how far a road winding to the north would take him.

More than 40 miles out of town, at about 9:30 that night, he found out. As Pink Floyd’s “Echoes” played on the stereo and temperature dipped well below zero in the darkness, Vial’s pickup plunged into a snowdrift.

“I made an attempt at digging myself out and realized how badly I was stuck,” said Vial. He was wearing tennis shoes, jeans and a $30 jacket from Sears. “I would have been frostbit before I ever got the thing out of there.”

Vial found himself alone near Salmon Lake, on a road that doubles as a snowmachine trail in the winter and stretches inland from the Bering Sea city. Far beyond the reach of his cellphone, Vial slipped into a fleece sleeping bag liner and wrapped a bath towel around his feet. He occasionally started the truck to run the heater and listen to the radio.

Was anybody talking about him? Did they know he was missing?

By the third day, Vial said, the truck was nearly out of gas.


WIDE-RANGING SEARCH


“I felt really pissed at myself,”
Vial said. “I shouldn’t have been out there by myself unprepared for what I knew was possible.”

Normally Vial carries a sleeping bag, extra gasoline and other survival gear in the 2000 Toyota, he said. But on this trip he had few supplies, no food and no water. Even his dogs, a pair of labs that usually accompany him on drives, stayed home.

Vial kept busy trying to think of ways to stay warm. His family was out of town, searchers said. No one would know he was gone until he failed to show up for work at 3:30 p.m. Tuesday.

“He’s a very punctual employee,”
said John Handeland, general manager for Nome Joint Utility System, where Vial works as an operator mechanic. “By 4 o’clock we figured something was wrong,”

No one could reach Vial on the phone. Co-workers patrolling the town that night found no sign of his pickup.

Handeland called police on Wednesday when Vial missed work for a second day.

The Nome Volunteer Fire Department was alerted and Vial’s co-workers and volunteer rescuers drove surrounding roads in search of the Toyota.

One searcher drove 41 miles along Kougarok Road — just a few miles from where Vial sat shivering and stranded in his pickup — but saw no tracks. The searcher turned back as daylight disappeared and the road conditions worsened, Handeland said.

Troopers joined the search. Rescuers looked for Vial on the ground and from the air, in planes and from a helicopter.

“When we get called on situations like this, it’s a needle in a haystack,”
said Jim West Jr., a Nome fire department captain and search and rescue coordinator.

For Vial, the cold was worse than the hunger, he said. Still he scoured the pickup in vain for food.

His only provisions: Snow, and a few cans of Coors Light that had frozen solid in the cab.

Vial ate the beers like cans of beans. “I cut the lids off and dug it out with a knife,” he said.


FIGHTING FOR WARMTH

The overnight low temperature in Nome dropped from about 12 below Monday night — not counting windchill — to 17 below on Wednesday morning, said National Weather Service meteorologist Charles Aldrich.

Battling for warmth, Vial wrapped a bath towel around his feet and placed another over his knees and thighs. He shook his ankles and knees to keep moving. He stuffed rags in his clothes and unraveled tissue paper, jamming it down around his feet.

“When I was just sitting there in my coat in the sleeping bag liner I would pull my arms inside my T-shirt to try and utilize my body heat as much as I could,”
Vial said. “That worked fine for some time, as far as keeping my torso warm and my arms. But my legs and feet where getting pretty cold.”

The wind rumbled like airplane engines, Vial said. He thought about his daughter, and about what would happen if no one found him in time.

“I tried to sleep when I could,”
Vial said, “but I knew that I might not wake up.”

When he did close his eyes, Vial said, strange and vivid images appeared. “Saw my daughter. Saw my job. Saw some things that didn’t look like people.”

He would picture himself driving around Nome, saying hello to friends, only to snap awake and find himself back in the truck, freezing.

At one point Vial decided he would only fire up the pickup’s engine once a day. “(The gas tank) was on ‘E’ and the gas light was coming on,” he said.

Vial never heard the rescuers arrive. It was early Thursday afternoon, three days after he first became stranded in the snow, when they pulled up behind his pickup. A co-worker and another volunteer opened the door to the truck, he said.

They gave him a Snickers bar — it seemed too dry to eat, he said — and an orange soda.

Vial described the more than 60-hour ordeal in a short phone interview Friday from Nome. His daughter was home from Anchorage. He planned to visit a doctor Friday afternoon, then return to work.

Vial’s legs felt as if they’d been beaten, he said, but he found no signs of frostbite. “I weighed myself last night,” he said. “I lost approximately 16 pounds.”

Read more: SOURCE

United States of Shame – What’s YOUR State Worst at?

United States of Shame – What’s YOUR State Worst at?

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Whether it’s the highest rate of bestiality (We’re looking at you, Washington) or the most environmentally unfriendly (Let’s hear it for Indiana!), every state has something to be ashamed about. The full list of shameful, shameful superlatives is below.

Rationale and statistics:

Most stats taken from http://www.americashealthrankings.org/ and http://www.census.gov/compendia/statab/rankings.html (unless otherwise noted)


1. Alabama: highest rate of stroke (3.8 percent) (tied with Oklahoma)

2. Alaska: highest suicide rate (23.6 suicides per 100,000 people in 2004)

3. Arizona: highest rate of alcoholism

4. Arkansas: worst average credit score (636)

5. California: most air pollution (15.2 micrograms per cubic meter)

6. Colorado: highest rate of cocaine use per capita (3.9 percent total population)

7. Connecticut: highest rate of breast cancer

8. Delaware: highest abortion rate (27 per 1,000 women aged 15 to 44)

9. Florida: highest rate of identity theft (122.3 reports per 100,000 people)

10. Georgia: sickly based on highest rate of influenza

11. Hawaii –highest cost of living (tied with California)

12. Idaho – lowest level of Congressional clout

13. Illinois: highest rate of robbery (284.7 incidences per 100,000 people)

14. Indiana: rated the most environmentally unfriendly by NMI solutions

15. Iowa: highest percentage of people age 85 and older (1.8 percent) (tied with three other states)

16. Kansas: poorest health based on highest average number of limited activity days per month (3.5 days)

17. Kentucky: most cancer deaths (227 per 100,000 people) (BONUS fact: Kentucky also has the highest rate of tobacco smokers – 25.6 percent)

18. Louisiana: highest rate of gonorrhea (264.4 reported cases per 100,000 people)

19. Maine: dumbest state claim based on lowest average SAT score (1389)

20. Maryland: highest rate of AIDS diagnosis (27.6 people per 100,000 people)

21. Massachusetts: worst drivers claim based on highest rate of auto accidents

22. Michigan: highest unemployment rate (13.6 percent)

23. Minnesota: highest number of reported tornadoes (123 in 2010)

24. Mississippi: highest rate of obesity (35.3 percent of total population)

BONUS facts: Mississippi ranks last in the most number of categories. These include highest rate of child poverty (31.9 percent), highest rate of infant mortality (10.3 percent) lowest median household income ($35,078), highest teen birth rate (71.9 per 1,000 women aged 15 to 19) and highest overall rate of STDs.

25. Missouri: highest rate of bankruptcy (700 out of every 100,000 people)

26. Montana: highest rate of drunk driving deaths (1.12 deaths per 100 million miles driven)

27. Nebraska: highest rate of women murdered annually

28. Nevada: highest rate violent crime (702.2 offenses per 100,000 people). BONUS fact: Nevada also has the highest rate of foreclosure (one in 99 houses)

29. New Hampshire: highest rate of corporate taxes

30. New Jersey: highest rate of citizen taxation (11.8 percent)

31. New Mexico: antisocial claim based on lowest ranking in social heath policies

32. New York: longest average daily commute (30.6 minutes)

33. North Carolina: lowest average teacher salary

34. North Dakota: ranked last in ugliest residents report as chosen by The Daily Beast

35. Ohio: nerdiest state claim based on highest number of library visits per capita (6.9)

36. Oklahoma: highest rate of female incarceration

37. Oregon: highest rate of long-term homeless people

38. Pennsylvania: highest rate of arson deaths (55.56 annually)

39. Rhode Island: highest rate of illicit drug use (12.5 percent of population)

40. South Carolina: highest percentage of mobile homes (18.8 percent)

41. South Dakota: highest rate of forcible rape 76.5 per 100,000

42. Tennessee: chosen most corrupt state by The Daily Beast

43. Texas: lowest high school graduation rate (78.3 percent)

44. Utah: highest rate of of online porn subscriptions

45. Vermont: infertility claim based on lowest birth rate of any state (10.6 births per 1,000) (tied with Maine

46. Virginia: highest number of alcohol-related motorcyle deaths

47. Washington: most cases of bestiality (4 reported in 2010

48. West Virginia: highest rate of heart attack (6.5 percent of population)

49. Wisconsin: highest rate of binge drinking (23.2 percent of population)

50. Wyoming: highest rate of deadly car crashes (24.6 deaths per 100,000)

Thanks to Pleated Jeans for the best darn detective work about the worst damn things in our country.
SOURCE