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University of Akron engineering professor raises doubts about jet crash that killed Poland’s president

University of Akron engineering professor raises doubts about jet crash that killed Poland’s president

John Mangel

Lonnie Timmons III, The Plain DealerUniversity of Akron engineering professor Wieslaw Binienda shows a frame from his computer simulation of the tree-wing impact that downed Polish President Lech Kaczynski’s jet. The model shows that the wing, in green, severs the birch tree with minimal damage.

The 2010 jet crash that killed Poland’s president, first lady and dozens of dignitaries during a politically sensitive visit to Russia couldn’t have happened the way official investigations say, a University of Akron engineering professor’s analysis shows.

Wieslaw Binienda’s findings, based on computer modeling software that NASA used to analyze the space shuttle Columbia’s destruction, are causing ripples in his native Poland, where there is simmering distrust of the formal rulings that the crash was accidental.

Russian and Polish government teams determined that errors by the jet’s Polish military flight crew caused the aircraft to clip a tree, lose part of its left wing, flip over and crash short of a runway at fog-bound Smolensk Airdrome two years ago. The April 10 incident killed all 96 aboard.

But the tree impact that supposedly precipitated the crash wouldn’t have caused enough wing damage to down the plane, said Binienda, a well-regarded expert in fracture mechanics who heads the university’s civil engineering department.

Instead, Binienda’s computer model shows the wing would have lopped off the tree top “like a knife.” The collision would have caused relatively minor damage to the wing’s leading edge – not enough to seriously impair its lift capability and flip the jet.

“It’s absolutely impossible that the wing sheared and then it crashed the way [government investigators] described,” Binienda told The Plain Dealer in his first U.S. interview.

The soft-spoken engineer has become a key player in the international drama swirling around the crash.

Binienda has testified about his findings before the Polish and European parliaments, where politicians skeptical of the government probes are conducting their own inquiries. His analysis, coupled with the work of two other scientists who contend there is evidence of explosions aboard the jet just before the crash, has fueled speculation of a conspiracy and cover-up.

“We try to show that hasty judgment has been made, and the case should be re-opened and re-examined properly, without any conflicts of interest,” said Mateusz Kochanowski, a spokesman for European Conservatives and Reformists, or ECR.

Kochanowski’s father, Poland’s human rights ombudsman, died in the crash. The ECR, a political coalition within the European Parliament, organized a March 28 parliamentary hearing in Brussels at which Binienda and several other researchers testified. The organization’s petition urging a new investigation has collected half a million signatures, Kochanowski said.

The planeload of Polish VIPs, including President Lech Kaczynski, other senior government officials, military officers, clergy and the head of Poland’s national bank, was traveling to Russia on a somber, emotionally charged mission: to commemorate the 70th anniversary of the Katyn Massacre.

The series of World War II executions carried out by Soviet secret police in April and May 1940 left more than 20,000 Polish prisoners of war dead, many of them members of Poland’s elite.

The Soviet government blamed Nazi Germany for the mass killings. Only in the last two decades have Soviet and Russian officials begun to acknowledge the country’s responsibility for the massacre, slowly declassifying records, though still refusing to call the killings genocide or authorizing reparations. “There’s no crime in Polish history that’s been as covered up and falsified as that one,” said Padraic Kenney, who directs Indiana University’s Russian and East European Institute and the Polish Studies Center.

Though the massacre remains painful to Poles, relations between Russian and Poland have improved since the Cold War’s end and the rise of Polish democracy, said Kenney, “despite the fact that the president [Kaczynski] did tend to make somewhat aggressive statements about Russia.”

As president, Kaczynski was the Polish head of state. The country’s prime minister runs the government. Russian Prime Minister Vladimir Putin invited his Polish counterpart, Prime Minister Donald Tusk – but not President Kaczynski – to attend the first joint commemoration of the Katyn Massacre, on April 7, 2010, near Smolensk, Russia. Three days later, Kaczynski and other Polish dignitaries were supposed to attend a separate ceremony, also near Smolensk.

There, the president planned to deliver a speech that was both combative and conciliatory, with harsh criticism for the killings and cover-up under the Communist regime, praise for recent Russian actions, and a demand that the Putin government continue to release documents and acknowledge “the innocence of the victims.”

As President Kaczynski’s plane, a Russian-made Tupolev passenger jet, approached the Smolensk airport the morning of April 10, its pilot was worried about the weather. “Not looking good . . . it’s unknown whether we’ll land,” the veteran Polish Air Force commander remarked. He sought the advice of a Russian commercial pilot who had managed to set down at Smolensk a few minutes earlier. “Speaking honestly, it’s a bitch down here,” the Russian reported.

Running behind schedule and with a planeload of VIPs, the Polish pilot – who had been the co-pilot on Prime Minister Tusk’s flight to Smolensk three days earlier – decided to try an approach rather than diverting to another airport.

He told controllers he would abort the landing if visibility was too bad, making the “go-around” at no lower than 300 feet. The jet descended rapidly, with the tower advising that the flight was on course as it neared the runway.

Moments later, the jet’s ground collision warning system sounded, its automated voice repeating “Terrain ahead! Pull up! Pull up!” The alert should have triggered an emergency climb. At a height of about 200 feet, the co-pilot said “Go around,” apparently urging the pilot to abandon the landing attempt. The plane’s “black box” flight data recorder noted that either the pilot or co-pilot briefly tugged the control column to try to gain altitude, but the autopilot, which was still on, overrode the effort.The steep descent continued.

With the jet at about 164 feet, a controller instructed the pilot to level off. Seconds later, someone yanked the control column and shoved the throttles to maximum power for an emergency climb. But it was too late. The cockpit voice recorder captured the sound of the plane striking treetops, the flight crew’s curses, a controller shouting “Abort to second approach!” and finally someone’s scream as the aircraft smashed to the ground.

Russian and Polish aviation boards each conducted investigations of the crash. They agreed that the primary cause was the flight crew’s faulty decision to try to land in bad weather, their rapid descent below a safe altitude, and their failure to make the “go-around” maneuver in time.

The Russian report cited the flight crew for setting the pilot’s altimeter improperly (although others were reading correctly); descending too late and too steeply; flying too low; failing to take into account that the terrain dipped, then rose, near the runway; and ignoring repeated warnings from the ground collision system and human controllers.

Another primary cause, according to the Russian investigators, was “psychological pressure” to land from the head of the Polish Air Force. An analysis of the cockpit voice recorder indicated that the Air Force general was in the cockpit during the runway approach and – according to a blood test from his autopsy – was drunk.

The jet was doomed, the Russian probe determined, when, flying 16 feet above the ground and attempting to climb, its left wing struck a foot-thick birch tree trunk. The impact sheared off a third of the wing, which landed 121 yards from the tree, the Russians found. The loss of the wing tip caused the plane to dip sharply left, though it continued a slight climb. As the aircraft rolled, the stub of its left wing plowed into the ground, digging a deep trench. The fuselage flipped upside-down and ripped apart.

The Polish aviation board didn’t quibble with the Russian version of the crash dynamics, but it spread blame to Russian ground controllers who hadn’t warned the pilot he was off the glide path, and who waited too long to tell him to abort the landing.
Palace and candles.JPGView full sizeMarkus Schreiber, APA soldier stands guard near a sea of candles at the Presidential Palace in Warsaw, two days after President Lech Kaczynski died in a plane crash.

Other Polish government investigators questioned the autopsy finding that the Polish Air Force commander was drunk, that he pressured the flight crew to land, and that he was in the cockpit at all. A Polish re-analysis of the cockpit recording determined the voice the Russians had identified as the general’s was really the co-pilot’s. There also was consternation in Poland that Russia hadn’t returned the jet’s wreckage and black boxes, and that the crash victims’ coffins were sealed before they were shipped home.

With suspicions deepening in Poland, Binienda – in his Akron lab half a world away – began trying last summer to assess what he had been reading and hearing about the tragedy.

“There were more and more questions and there was no one doing any real [follow-up] investigation,” he said. “I said maybe it is time for me to see if I can do anything.”

The wing-tree impact became the target of his inquiry. It didn’t make sense to Binienda that, after a collision that severed a third of the wing, the jet would be able to climb almost 100 feet in altitude before crashing, as the Russian investigators had concluded. Robbed of lift and momentum, the damaged plane should drop like a stone.

Binienda specializes in fracture mechanics, a highly technical field that analyzes how and why materials break under stress. His focus is the lightweight stuff – aluminum, titanium and exotic polymers –used in aviation and aerospace. He often works with NASA and jet engine manufacturers. He is no stranger to aircraft structures.

To study the wing-tree impact, Binienda created a computer model using a software program called LS-DYNA. He and other engineers routinely use LS-DYNA to simulate complex fracture situations with lots of rapidly changing conditions, like when a loose, high-speed chunk of insulating foam bashed into the space shuttle Columbia’s wing during a 2003 launch, fatally damaging the orbiter.

With LS-DYNA and information from the crash reports, Binienda could input the strength, density and other properties of the wing and the tree. That allows a computer to calculate the impact forces and create a second-by-second, realistic 3-D animation of what happened.
Brother with coffin.JPGView full sizeAlik Keplicz, APJaroslaw Kaczynski, the twin brother of Polish President Lech Kaczynski, kneels next to his brother’s coffin at the military airport in Warsaw, Poland, on April 11, 2010.

Even when Binienda intentionally under-represented the wing’s strength and over-estimated the tree’s, the simulations still showed the wing slicing off the treetop while suffering only minor damage. The tree impact couldn’t have broken the wing, his model showed. Something else must have done that, and something else must have snapped off the treetop. (For the latter, Binienda suspects it was the powerful backwash from the jet’s engines as they passed overhead.)

Binienda’s simulation also showed that, for the wing tip to have landed where it did, the break must have happened at a higher altitude and closer to the runway than where the birch tree was located.

That seemed to fit with a more sinister crash scenario being advanced by two other Polish researchers who also are working with the Polish parliament inquiry – that two explosions during the landing attempt brought down the jet.

Kazimierz Nowaczyk, a University of Maryland physicist, and Gregory Szuladzinski, a mechanical engineer and expert in blast effects, base their theory on several pieces of evidence:

•Two sudden, sharp changes in the jet’s altitude, as recorded by its ground-collision warning equipment. The violent jolts, according to Nowaczyk’s analysis of the ground-collision readouts, took place when the plane was 226 feet past the birch tree. That position coincides with where Binienda, working independently, calculated that the wing tip must have come off. An explosion could explain the wing separation, Nowaczyk has testified.

•The contrasting positions of the jet’s fuselage pieces. The front portion landed upright while the rear was upside-down, suggesting an internal explosion that separated the pieces in mid-air.

•The large amount of debris and dismemberment of passengers’ bodies. “Shrapnel equals explosion, and there was plenty of it,” Szuladzinski said in an email, declining to comment further until his report to the parliament committee chair is released in May.
Russian soldiers at crash.JPGView full sizeMikhail Metzel, APRussian Interior Ministry soldiers secure the jet crash site near the Smolensk airport.

Both the Russian and Polish crash investigations determined that the crash would have subjected the plane and its occupants to severe G forces, which could account for the fragmentation. And Russian investigators said they detected no traces of explosives on the wreckage.

The U.S. manufacturer of the collision-warning system, Universal Avionics Systems Corp., working with the National Transportation Safety Board, analyzed the flight data for the Russian crash investigation. Neither the company nor the NTSB would comment on whether the readouts shows evidence of explosions, as Nowaczyk claims. The Russian aviation board and the Polish prime minister’s office did not respond to interview requests.

Binienda’s computer modeling of the tree impact is an unconventional approach to an aircraft crash analysis, said Greg Phillips, a veteran former NTSB investigator who’s now an aviation safety instructor at the University of Southern California. Still, “it sounds like the guy has all the credentials that would certainly set off the alarms that we really need to listen hard to this.”

Whether the birch tree fractured the wing or not is a moot point, said Paul Czysz, an aircraft design expert and professor emeritus at St. Louis University’s Parks College of Engineering, Aviation and Technology. “If that tree didn’t do it, there are about 50 others in front of it that could have,” said Czysz, who thinks pilot over-confidence caused the crash. “The fact that he hit the tree that far from the end of the runway means that unless he got that airplane up right away, he was dead. And very few pilots have the reactive skills to get that airplane up.”

The larger question of whether someone engineered the plane’s demise is a matter of debate. The dead president’s twin brother, Jaroslaw Kaczynski, leader of Poland’s conservative Law and Justice party and the country’s former prime minister, said in March he suspects the crash was an assassination.
Putin effigy burning.JPGView full sizeCzarek Sokolowski, APProtesters burn an effigy of Russia’s Prime Minister Vladimir Putin in front of the Russian Embassy in Warsaw, Poland, on April 9, 2012. The protesters believe the 2010 plane crash that killed Poland’s president and 95 others in Russia was an assassination.

Though he acknowledges there is no hard evidence, retired CIA intelligence officer Eugene Poteat thinks Russia downed the planeload of leaders to wipe out Poland’s pro-NATO, anti-Russian government.

“They had the means, the will, the knowledge, the background, the assets,” Poteat, who’s president of the Association of Former Intelligence Officers and served in the CIA during the Cold War, said in an interview. “Everything it takes to commit a crime like that, they’re past masters at it.”

Kenney, the East European scholar, is dubious of a plot.

“Kaczynski was not dangerous to the Russians,” he said. “Even if some rogue army officer thought [killing Polish government leaders] was a great idea, Putin certainly knew it wouldn’t have been. You have the president of a country with whom you had a sometimes rocky relationship die on your territory? Not a good thing.”

Binienda knows his high-profile position raising doubts about the crash’s official cause could jeopardize his professional reputation.

“If they show that I made an obvious error, it would be a tremendous blemish on my career,” he said. But “if I would hesitate to look for truth just because of my career, that would be a pretty bad scientific approach. I hope at a minimum I can bring people to ask questions, and at the end they will do the investigation and show that my work was incorrect or correct. Either way, I don’t mind.”

SOURCE

The bin Laden plot to kill President Obama


The bin Laden plot to kill President Obama

By David Ignatius

Before his death, Osama bin Laden boldly commanded his network to organize special cells in Afghanistan and Pakistan to attack the aircraft of President Obama and Gen. David H. Petraeus.

“The reason for concentrating on them,” the al-Qaeda leader explained to his top lieutenant, “is that Obama is the head of infidelity and killing him automatically will make [Vice President] Biden take over the presidency. .?.?. Biden is totally unprepared for that post, which will lead the U.S. into a crisis. As for Petraeus, he is the man of the hour .?.?. and killing him would alter the war’s path” in Afghanistan.

Administration officials said Friday that the Obama-Petraeus plot was never a serious threat.

The scheme is described in one of the documents taken from bin Laden’s compound by U.S. forces on May 2, the night he was killed. I was given an exclusive look at some of these remarkable documents by a senior administration official. They have been declassified and will be available soon to the public in their original Arabic texts and translations.

The man bin Laden hoped would carry out the attacks on Obama and Petraeus was the Pakistani terrorist Ilyas Kashmiri. “Please ask brother Ilyas to send me the steps he has taken into that work,” bin Laden wrote to his top lieutenant, Atiyah Abd al-Rahman. A month after bin Laden’s death, Kashmiri was killed in a U.S. drone attack.

The plot to target Obama was probably bluster, since al-Qaeda apparently lacked the weapons to shoot down U.S. aircraft. But it’s a chilling reminder that even when he was embattled and in hiding, bin Laden still dreamed of pulling off another spectacular terror attack against the United States.

The terrorist leader urged in a 48-page directive to Atiyah to focus “every effort that could be spent on attacks in America,” instead of operations within Muslim nations. He told Atiyah to “ask the brothers in all regions if they have a brother .?.?. who can operate in the U.S. [He should be able to] live there, or it should be easy for him to travel there.”

U.S. analysts don’t see evidence that these plots have materialized. “The organization lacks the ability to plan, organize and execute complex, catastrophic attacks, but the threat persists,” says a senior administration analyst who has carefully reviewed the documents.

The bin Laden who emerges from these communications is a terrorist CEO in an isolated compound, brooding that his organization has ruined its reputation by killing too many Muslims in its jihad against America. He writes of the many departed “brothers” who have been lost to U.S. drone attacks. But he’s far from the battlefield himself in his hideout in Abbottabad, Pakistan, where he seems to spend considerable time watching television.

The garbled syntax of bin Laden’s communications may result from their being dictated to several of his wives, according to the U.S. analyst. And his rambling laundry list of recommendations illustrates the problems of communicating with subordinates when it could take several months to receive an answer. The al-Qaeda leader had a “great fear of irrelevance,” the analyst believes.

Because of constant harassment and communications difficulties in Pakistan’s tribal areas, bin Laden encouraged al-Qaeda leaders to leave north and south Waziristan for more distant and remote locations.

Bin Laden had an unlikely managerial focus, for such a notorious terrorist. He discusses the need for “deputy emirs” and “acting emirs” to run regional operations when the local boss is away, and he suggests that emirs should serve two-year terms and write an “annual report to be sent to the central group detailing the local situation.” He allowed a relatively frank exchange with his subordinates, who voiced criticisms about the organization’s errors.

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?The long-hunted al-Qaeda leader and chief architect of the Sept. 11, 2001, terrorist attacks on the United States was killed by U.S. forces May 1 in a surgical raid.

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Though open to internal debate, bin Laden and his aides had rigid views about Muslim theology. Atiyah sent his leader a strident letter in June 2009 detailing what he saw as doctrinal errors among other jihadists.

Bin Laden’s biggest concern was al-Qaeda’s media image among Muslims. He worried that it was so tarnished that, in a draft letter probably intended for Atiyah, he argued that the organization should find a new name.

The al-Qaeda brand had become a problem, bin Laden explained, because Obama administration officials “have largely stopped using the phrase ‘the war on terror’ in the context of not wanting to provoke Muslims,” and instead promoted a war against al-Qaeda. The organization’s full name was “Qaeda al-Jihad,” bin Laden noted, but in its shorthand version, “this name reduces the feeling of Muslims that we belong to them.” He proposed 10 alternatives “that would not easily be shortened to a word that does not represent us.” His first recommendation was “Taifat al-tawhid wal-jihad,” or Monotheism and Jihad Group.

Bin Laden ruminated about “mistakes” and “miscalculations” by affiliates in Iraq and elsewhere that had killed Muslims, even in mosques. He told Atiyah to warn every emir, or regional leader, to avoid these “unnecessary civilian casualties,” which were hurting the organization.

“Making these mistakes is a great issue,” he stressed, arguing that spilling “Muslim blood” had resulted in “the alienation of most of the nation [of Islam] from the [Mujaheddin].” Local al-Qaeda leaders should “apologize and be held responsible for what happened.”

Bin Laden also criticized subordinates for linking their operations to local grievances rather than the overarching Muslim cause of Palestine. He chided his affiliate in Yemen for saying an operation was a response to U.S. bombing there. He even scolded the organizers of the spectacular December 2009 suicide attack on the CIA base in Khost, Afghanistan, for describing it as revenge for the killing of Pakistani Taliban leader Baitullah Mehsud. “It was necessary to discuss Palestine first,” lectured bin Laden.

Bin Laden’s focus on attacking the U.S. homeland led to sharp disagreements with his deputy, Ayman al-Zawahiri, who favored easier and more opportunistic attacks on U.S. forces in Iraq, Afghanistan and other areas.

Bin Laden told Atiyah that al-Qaeda’s best chance for establishing an Islamic state was Yemen, which he described as the “launching point” for attacks on the Persian Gulf oil states. “Control of these nations means control of the world,” he wrote. But he worried that the push in Yemen would come too soon, and he advised his colleagues to wait three years, if necessary, before making a decisive move. By fighting too hard in Syria in the early 1980s, he noted, the Muslim Brotherhood “lost a generation of men.”

Bin Laden and his aides hoped for big terrorist operations to commemorate the 10th anniversary of Sept. 11, 2001. They also had elaborate media plans. Adam Gadahn, a U.S.-born media adviser, even discussed in a message to his boss what would be the best television outlets for a bin Laden anniversary video.

“It should be sent for example to ABC, CBS, NBC, and CNN and maybe PBS and VOA. As for Fox News let her die in her anger,” Gadahn wrote. At another point, he said of the networks: “From a professional point of view, they are all on one level — except [Fox News] channel, which falls into the abyss as you know, and lacks objectivity, too.”

What an unintended boost for Fox, which can now boast that it is al-Qaeda’s least favorite network.

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Princess Diana Death: French Authorities May Arrest British Police, Conspiracy Re-ignited

Princess Diana Death: French Authorities May Arrest British Police, Conspiracy Re-ignited
| By Keelan Balderson |

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French authorities may seek an international arrest warrant for two former police chiefs, who withheld a prophetic note in which Princess Diana seemingly predicted her assassination by car crash. Something she stated on more than one occasion.

Former Scotland Yard chief Lord Condon and former Assistant Commissioner of Specialist Operations Sir David Veness, have been ordered to attend an interview in Paris to address why the note was under lock and key for 3 years following Diana’s death. If they fail to attend they will be treated as suspects. The note remained hidden even when Lord Condon’s successor Lord Stevens took over as Metropolitan Police Commissioner, suggesting the orders may have came from a higher authority.

The note was handed to the MET by Diana’s Lawyer Lord Mishcon shortly after the 1997 Paris tunnel crash, which also claimed the lives of Diana’s boyfriend Dodi Fayed and driver Henri Paul. It drew on a meeting between Diana and the law firm where she claimed her life was in danger; the record of the meeting in the form of a hand-written note says efforts would be made to get rid of her “…be it by some accident in her car such as pre-prepared brake failure or whatever.”

Lord Condon and Sir Veness have publicly claimed that they made the decision not to release the document unless there was a suggestion that the crash was not an accident [2], but the French Judge Gerard Caddeo may see this as withholding the very evidence that does suggest it wasn’t an accident. Under French law, “removing or concealing” evidence, which could “facilitate the discovery of a crime”, is punishable by three to five years in jail or a fine.

Coinciding with the release of controversial Keith Allen documentary “Unlawful Killing” that suggests Diana was assassinated, this re-ignition of the case may open a whole new can of worms, right when the British establishment is being rocked by the phone hacking scandal.

It should be noted that this isn’t the only document where Diana’s death appears to be foreshadowed. As reported by The Telegraph another document was written way back in 1993!
A handwritten letter in which Diana, Princess of Wales claimed that the Prince of Wales was plotting to kill her so he could marry Tiggy Legge-Bourke, the former nanny to Princes William and Harry, has been shown at the inquest into her death.

That letter reads:
“This particular phase in my life is the most dangerous – my husband is planning ‘an accident’ in my car, brake failure and serious head injury in order to make the path clear for him to marry Tiggy. Camilla is nothing but a decoy, so we are all being used by the man in every sense of the word.”

Even the most non-conspiratorial minded person has to scratch their head with intrigue that Diana feared for her death by orchestrated car crash as early as 1993, and then wound up dead in a car crash, while one of the notes that predicted this was subsequently hidden by police officers honored by the Queen, whose oh so Royal family would be prime suspects in an assassination of the Princess.

So far the official story is that the Mercedes-Benz carrying the victims collided with the 13th pillar of the Pont de l’Alma tunnel, because driver Henri-Paul was intoxicated with alcohol, anti-depressants and possibly carbon monoxide, causing him to lose control of the wheel. However video surveillance at the hotel that evening show an upright Paul who appears to be in full control of his faculties. Moments before entering the vehicle he can be seen quite happily tying his shoe laces with no obvious impairment.

The media frenzy that called Henri “drunk as a pig” [3], was well underway before samples had even been presented [4], suggesting the narrative was to some degree pre-arranged or grossly speculative. Independent forensic pathologists have reviewed the toxicology reports and concluded that the blood samples were not stored at the correct temperatures, meaning higher levels of alcohol would have been recorded due to decomposition of the blood.[5] Furthermore it was claimed that Henri-Paul had over 20% carbon monoxide blood content, which would cause any regular person severe head-aches and a lack of coordination, which again is refuted by the CCTV evidence of Paul in the hotel lobby.

No acceptable explanation has been given for the presence of Carbon Monoxide. Initial reports claim it came from the vehicles airbags, but this was later ruled out. It seems absurd that a life saving system could release a toxic gas. It quite logically has been suggested that this intoxication came post-crash from exhaust fumes, but Henri was supposed to have died on impact rendering him unable to breath in any of the fumes. Smoking was also blamed, but Toxicologist Professor Robert Forrest ultimately had to concede that “It’s either conspiracy or cock-up.”[6] “…he could not find any logical explanation for the findings.”

A thorough investigation needs to follow all leads and motives. The Henri-Paul claim is flimsy, so it would be worth following up on Diana’s cries for help, specifically the idea that she was to be murdered by “pre-prepared brake failure”. Such a technique for carrying out assassinations does purportedly exist within the secret services of the world. According to author Jon King it’s called the “Boston Breaks” method and involves installing hardware within a vehicle, which allows the assassination team to jam the steering column and braking functions remotely, causing the car to hurtle out of control, unable to break or steer. This is dealt with in his book Diana: The Evidence

Also in the book The Feathermen by former SAS demolition expert and famous British explorer Sir Ranulph Fiennes, he recounts the alleged assassination of Major Michael Marman via this very method.

The Clinic had been watching Major Michael Marman, and had determined that he frequently drove along the A303 arterial road, in Wiltshire, south-west England, on personal business. While doing this, he was habitually alone, and the fact that his vehicle was a relatively flimsy Citroen 2CV meant that a crash was the perfect method to kill him. Nevertheless, the Clinic dared not tamper with Marman’s car or deploy a driver to ram him off the road, since their contractual obligation to make the death appear accidental would almost certainly come unstuck under the slightest police investigation. They therefore decided to use a proxy: an apparently random driver who would unknowingly become the Clinic’s untraceable instrument of execution, by colliding with Marman.

Through relatively simple research, they discovered a businessman whose offices were in Plymouth and London, and who regularly drove between the two along the A303 road. This was Air Marshal (ret’d) Sir Peter Horsley, former equerry to the Duke of Edinburgh and to the Queen, and ex-Commander in Chief of Britain’s atomic strike force, who now worked for an engineering firm, ML Holdings. Study and surveillance showed that Sir Peter was due to drive from London to Plymouth for a board meeting on 11 November 1986, at a time which would mean he would pass Major Marman in the opposite direction along the length of the A303. The Clinic then entered Horsely’s garage during the night of 10-11 November, and, over an eight-hour period, fitted a ‘parasite’ braking system in the cavities of his BMW, in such a way that it couldn’t be seen on immediate inspection. This radio-controlled system was powered by a scuba-diving cylinder of compressed air, which would allow each of the car’s brakes to be applied separately, without the control of the driver.

The next day, having practised their technique for weeks with stock cars and models, two of the Clinic members shadowed Horsely, while keeping in radio communication with a second Clinic team, shadowing Marman. As Marman’s 2CV and Horsely’s BMW approached each other along the A303, the parasite braking system was applied, and Horsely lost control of his vehicle, which was steered across the central reservation and into Marman’s path. the ensuing collision killed Marman outright, and severely injured Horsely. Horsely was initially under suspicion of reckless driving, but fortunately had a witness who had been driving behind him, who testified that he had seen a puff of smoke emerge from the rear of Horsely’s car immediately before he lost control: at inquest, the local coroner said the accident would remain unexplained. The more definitely so, since the Clinic’s parasite brake-system had been secretly removed after the accident while the BMW was impounded at the police garage facility. The Feather Men, who failed to prevent this assassination, ultimately learned exactly how this scenario unfolded when they captured and interrogated the Clinic’s chief assassin.

In his autobiography, Sounds From Another Room, Horsley says that he was accelerating to about 60 miles an hour when the car began to react strangely. He saw a grey Volvo closing up quickly behind him and as he was about to wave it past, his BMW spun sharply to the left, the brakes screeching, and then sharply to the right and back again. This is remarkably similar to what happened to the Mercedes before it struck the pillar.

Horsley wrote:
“Out of the corner of my eye I saw the grey Volvo accelerating past me at high speed. My car had now developed a mind of its own as it swung broadside and skidded down the road. With a lurch it hit the central reservation, mounted the grass verge separating the two lanes of the highway and crossed over into the opposite carriageway. I had just time to see a small car approaching from the opposite direction. I hit it sideways on with tremendous force. In a split-second the driver’s horror-stricken face was visible and I heard his hoarse scream.”

It’s worth noting the Mercedes carrying Diana had previously been stolen. The Daily Mail notes:
It had been stolen several months before the accident and there are those who speculate that this might have been an opportunity to tamper with the car.

The general public are familiar with Prince Charles’ affair with Camilla, but Diana’s 1993 letter claims he wanted her dead to pursue a marriage with Tiggy Legge-Bourke (the Prince’s nanny), not Camilla. In fact Camilla herself nearly died in a car accident shortly before Diana’s death [7], and as the letter states: “Camilla is nothing more than a decoy.”

Lets suppose the massive coincidences here are simply that, coincidences, and Diana’s death was just a tragic accident. We still have two documents where Diana feared for her death via car crash. Did Charles and/or the perpetrators strike it lucky; did fate deliver a dead Diana in the exact manner they wanted?

Or are we just being silly conspiracy theorists? If that’s the case, the alternative is to believe that Diana was a lying bitch….

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