Tag Archives: Bullying

Man Sentenced to Jail After Teasing Disabled Girl

Man Sentenced to Jail After Teasing Disabled Girl
By Christina Lopez |

An Ohio man faces one month of jail time for teasing and taunting a 1o-year-old girl with cerebral palsy after a video of the incident went viral.

We looked on Prison Pass, a site with detailed information on all prison location that on Nov. 27, Judge John A. Poulos of the Canton Municipal Court sentenced 43-year-old William Bailey to 29 days in jail. The amount is initially based on a bail schedule but may change to a higher or lower amount based on the circumstances of the case. Once an amount has been set, your bail bond agent will determine the bail amount that you need to be released. The bail bond is a small portion or percentage of the total bail set by the Judge. You then pay the bail agent to secure your release. You will get the additional info here regarding to bail bond amount calculator.

The taunting occurred on Sept. 26, when Tricia Knight and her mother-in-law were waiting for her children’s bus to return from school. Knight’s three children, including 10-year-old Hope, attend Walker Elementary with Bailey’s 9-year-old son, Joseph.

What happened next was caught on an iPod camera by Knight’s mother-in-law, Marie Prince.

William Bailey “was dragging his leg and patting his arm across his chest to pick his son Joseph up,” said Knight. “I asked him to please stop doing this. ‘My daughter can see you.’ He then told his son to walk like the R-word.”

The next day Knight posted the video on her Facebook page while Prince uploaded the video they called “Bus Stop Ignorance” to YouTube. Within days, the video went viral.

The Knight family has lived next door to the Baileys for the past two years, and the incident at the bus stop, according to Knight, is the culmination of rising tensions and intimidation against her kids.

In the days that followed the taunting at the bus stop, the Knight family filed a complaint with Canton City prosecutors.

Jennifer Fitzsimmons, the chief assistant city prosecutor for this case, says in the three years she’s been in this role, she’s never seen anything like this.

“I think when we look at cases, there’s case law out there regarding people commenting and gesturing against race and religion. But when there’s nothing out there regarding disabilities, it took me a little bit longer to come to a decision.”

After Fitzsimmons reviewed the Knight family’s complaint, a police report based on a phone call from the Knight family, and the video captured by Prince, she decided to press charges.

“It was settled without Hope having to relive what she saw and how it impacted her,” said Fitzsimmons. “I think the trial could have been just as traumatic as the event itself.”

Bailey, who works as a truck driver, was charged twice. He was originally charged for aggravated menacing, a misdemeanor of the first degree. In this charge, the victim was Knight, an incident she says took place the same day as the bus stop scene.

Bailey, she said, “was swinging a tow chain on his porch, saying he was going to choke me until I stopped twitching. I sent my kids with my mother-in-law to leave with them. My husband called the sheriff.”

In Ohio, a menacing charge is a misdemeanor fourth degree, which carries a maximum of 30 days in jail.

The second original charge, for the bus stop incident, was disorderly conduct, a misdemeanor of the fourth degree. A disorderly conduct is a minor misdemeanor and carries no jail time.

Although Bailey’s sentencing technically reflects the charges brought by his actions toward Knight, Hope’s mother, Fitzsimmons explains how the plea deal enabled the sentence to cover his actions toward Hope.

“Because the menacing misdemeanor charge was directed toward Hope’s mother, and they’re all interrelated, the judge took into account all the actions of Mr. Bailey and the entire Holcomb family,” said Fitzsimmons.

Bailey “entered a plea of ‘no contest’ to a menacing charge and to disorderly conduct,” said Fitzsimmons. His sentence will go into effect on Jan. 2.

Judge Poulos required Bailey to pay $400 in court costs as well as other fees. He was given a credit for one day which is why his sentence is 29 days and not the maximum 30.

Following the Nov. 27 hearing, Bailey’s attorney, John R. Giua, released a statement and apology on Bailey’s behalf, according to the The Repository, an online newspaper for Stark County, Ohio.

“I don’t think this sentence will change things because it hasn’t so far,” said Knight.

Knight says living next door to the Baileys affects their everyday lives.

Just last summer, said Knight, 9-year-old Joseph Bailey came over to play with Knight’s children and brought over a pocket knife, threatening to “cut [Hope] up,” followed by name calling. That harassment continued into the school year.

Since the bus stop incident, Knight has spoken with the bus driver and the school’s principal. Knight now drives Hope to school every day while her other two children ride another bus to school.

Hope was born 29 weeks premature after Knight was involved in a head-on auto collision. When she was born, Hope weighed only two pounds, 12 ounces, which caused several medical problems resulting in two brain surgeries. Knight says her daughter fought for her life the first two years.

As for whether this case presents a new precedent in Ohio is another debate.

“I don’t know if it sets a precedent so much maybe as it begins a conversation between people,” said Fitzsimmons. “I think conversation starts progress, and I think if it can bring something else to light, it would be good.”

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Killing me Softly: Self-harm figures soar

Self-harm figures soar in a generation under pressure

Matt Chorley

More than 1,800 children aged under 10 have been hospitalised for self-harming in the past decade, sparking fears of a generation unable to cope with the pressures of childhood.

Last year alone almost 150 boys and girls aged 10 or under were admitted to hospital for intentional self-harm, including more than 80 pre-school children.

In a sign of a worsening problem, the number of girls and women aged under 25 admitted in the past 10 years has soared by 44 per cent to more than 26,270 in 2010-11. Among boys and men of the same age, the figure has leapt by a third to 11,656. The figures are for hospitals in England.

The Department of Health (DoH) admits that “only a fraction” of cases of self-harm are seen in hospitals, so the true scale of the crisis will be much larger.

“These shocking statistics should act as a wake-up call to everyone who cares about the welfare of young people,”
said Lucia Russell, the director of campaigns, policy and participation at YoungMinds, a charity which is working with the Government to redesign mental-health services for children. “Self-harm is often dismissed as merely attention-seeking behaviour, but it’s a sign that young people are feeling terrible internal pain and are not coping.”

According to officials, an episode of self-harm is often triggered by an argument or another upset, but can also be linked to bullying, low self-esteem, and worries about sexual orientation. The Government has promised £32m to improve access to psychological therapies for children and young people over the next four years.

Paul Burstow, a Liberal Democrat health minister, told The Independent on Sunday that, for too long, mental illness among children was overlooked by the NHS. “It has really suffered from being the poor cousin of mental health, which was itself the Cinderella service. It was not a priority for the NHS.

“For half of all mental health problems in this country the symptoms first show during adolescence. Let’s look at the early signs and support families with proper therapies. It is about moving to intervene early.”

More than one in 10 children aged 15 to 16 report having self-harmed in their lifetime. However, the DoH insists it is “rare for very young children” to self harm. A million children will have a diagnosable mental-health disorder. Childhood mental illness costs up to £59,000 per child every year.

The rise in hospital admissions has been steepest among women aged 17 to 25, rising by 50 per cent between 2001 and 2011.

Separate figures released last week show 40,000 under-25s were rushed to A&E in 2009-10 after self-harming, up from 36,000 in 2007-08.

Earlier this year, the Government launched a new strategy, No Health Without Mental Health, to tackle the problem. Officials are working with young people, parents and YoungMinds to redesign specialist services for children, focussing initially on cognitive behavioural therapy and parenting therapy.

Ministers hope to reduce by as much as 40 per cent the number of people in adulthood who have mental health problems. The economic and social costs of mental health in the UK are almost £100bn.

Last month a study by the charity Mind warned that a combination of rising demand and spending cuts was threatening the viability of mental health services.

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Sexual Abuse Taught In The Classroom

Accusations of Student Abuse and Child Pornography Cover-up at Oxford & Cherwell Valley College

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Nestled in David Cameron’s Conservative heartland, this leading college, states that it is the largest provider of further education training in Oxfordshire. According to the web page of college Principal and Chief Executive Sally Dicketts “We pride ourselves on the fact that we have something for everyone, we are all members of a vibrant and diverse community,?and we are passionate about helping each individual to achieve their potential.”

Despite this welcoming accolade, former pupils and members of staff accuse Oxford & Cherwell Valley College management of collaborating in a calculated cover-up of a series of perverted and unpleasant activities in the college which started to manifest around 2007.

Allegations suggest that aside from sexual assaults on girls, students were encouraged to drink alcohol in classrooms and were shown pornographic material on college computers – in some cases on the private mobile phones of staff, including images involving children. Boys and girls also suffered bullying at the hands of staff, and those who attempted to warn senior managers of the horrendous activities, were reportedly warned off or pressurised to keep quiet.

Repeated complaints by staff and students did eventually force an investigation, but those present at the college at the time claim that the investigation led by Mr Ray Tregear, was biased so as to protect the college and cover-up the abuses.

Informers also claim that although Thames Valley Police did make some enquiries into abuse and pornography allegations these were low key, incompetent and involved officers working outside normal codes of conduct. Most surprising is that police did not impound computers for detailed forensic examination.

In February 2010 the Oxford Mail newspaper revealed that a Lecturer from the college had been suspended from his employment following complaints that he was showing pornography to pupils. Sources stated that he was later dismissed. It is alleged that this was most likely under a so called voluntary compromise agreement and gagging order. It is also understood that the college has spent some £233,000 on similar compromise agreements since January 2010.

The UK Column has recently learned that OCVC suddenly replaced some 200 computers in July 2010 after the accusations of abuses refused to die down. A local Oxford IT supplier apparently decommissioned the old machines including wiping hard drives.

Oxford and Cherwell Valley College Head Sally Dicketts and Thames Valley Police Chief Constable Sara Thornton are both connected with the Women’s Leadership Network and political charity Common Purpose.

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Example To Follow? Now we know why Bullying is an epidemic

14-Year-Old Special Needs Student Speaks Out On TODAY About Being Bullied By Teachers

Laura Hibbard


“We were shocked … we didn’t know,”
14-year-old Cheyenne’s father tearfully said in an interview on the TODAY show Tuesday.

After their complaints to the school board reportedly went uninvestigated, the parents of the special needs student decided to hide a tape recorder in their daughter’s clothes. What they captured left them upset — and angry.

“Don’t you want to do something about that belly?
” teaching aide Kelly Chaffins said to Cheyenne, according to the recording.

“Yes,” the girl responded.

“Well, evidently you don’t because you don’t do anything at home,” Chaffins said. “You sit at home and watch TV.”

WATCH:

In his emotional interview, Cheyenne’s father told NBC’s Ann Curry that his daughter started to react to the stress.

“She got to where she didn’t want to go to school,” he said. “She was … starting to harm herself to keep from going to school and we knew we had to do something at that point.

After bringing the recordings to the school board, officials demanded that Chaffins resign. Chaffins subsequently announced her resignation while Christy Wilt, the classroom teacher, has been put on unpaid leave and ordered to undergo eight hours of training on how to stop child abuse. But these consequences aren’t enough for the family’s attorneys.

“There’s no good solution, but we don’t think that this teacher and this aide should be working with students, especially special needs students,”
one of the attorneys told Curry. “We would like her to be terminated.”

Cheyenne’s parents sued the school district and received $300,000 in damages.

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