Tag Archives: Cocaine

Whitney Houston was murdered’: Private investigator claims he has video proving singer was killed by drug dealers

Whitney Houston was murdered’: Private investigator claims he has video proving singer was killed by drug dealers

By Daily Mail Reporter

Whitney Houston was murdered by drug dealers and a new surveillance video proves it, a Hollywood private investigator is claiming

Paul Huebl says he has turned over evidence to the FBI that shows the 48-year-old singer was killed over a drug debt in February.

The medical examiner ruled that she drowned in her bathtub at the Beverly Hilton hotel after taking a cocktail of cocaine, marijuana and several legal drugs.
Case closed: The Los Angeles County Coroner ruled Whitney Houston’s death an accidental drowning after she was found dead in her bathtub

Case closed: The Los Angeles County Coroner ruled Whitney Houston’s death an accidental drowning after she was found dead in her bathtub
Tragedy: The singer’ is carried to a hearse in a coffin after her funeral in Newark, N.J., in February

Tragedy: The 48-year-old singer’s body is carried to a hearse after her funeral in Newark, N.J., in February

The National Enquirer is reporting that Huebl believes the troubled star was targeted by several ‘high powered drug dealers who sent thugs to collect a huge debt she owed for drugs.’

She owed $1.5million to dealers, according to some reports.

However, Huebl told MailOnline that he doesn’t know for certain that Houston was killed – only that evidence he collected could point in that direction.

More…

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He says that the star received a delivery of cocaine to her room the day before her death and could be heard saying, ‘I’m tired of this sh*t.’

He says the Houston had previously been subjected to harassment by dealers trying to collect on her debt.
Tragic: The troubled star had a potent cocktail of cocaine, marijuana and prescription drugs in her system when she died at the Beverly Hilton hotel

Tragic: The troubled star had a potent cocktail of cocaine, marijuana and prescription drugs in her system when she died at the Beverly Hilton hotel

Huebl says he obtained surveillance video that shows two unknown men who repeatedly went to the Beverly Hilton and integrated themselves into Houston’s entourage.
Private investigator: Paul Huebl, the man who is making the claims about Houston’s death, is a former cop who became an actor

Private investigator: Paul Huebl, the man who is making the claims about Houston’s death, is a former police officer who became an actor

The private investigator claims these are the men who may have slipped into Houston’s hotel room and killed her.

He also disagrees with the Los Angeles County Coroner’s ruling that the star’s death was ‘accidental.’

‘Whitney’s body shows classic defense wounds that would have occurred while she was battling for her life,’ he said.

However, Huebl conceded that the marks on her hands and fingernails could have been obtained in some other ways and that they were only ‘suspected’ defensive wounds.

The private investigator said he also has evidence that Houston’s hotel room was ransacked, showing further hints of a violent struggle.

Huebl says he gave his evidence to the Chicago field office of the FBI in the hopes that the agency will open a criminal investigation.

‘I think that if you put all these things together, they do kind of spell homicide, with a big red capital “H,”‘ he told MailOnline.

The FBI did not immediately respond to requests for comment. A message left with Beverley Hills police was not immediately returned.

Heubl, a former Chicago police officer who became an actor after he retired, says he conducted the investigation after being hired by a client who did not believe the official reports on Houston’s death.

He believes Beverley Hills police did not fully investigate Houston’s death because they did not want to bring the negative attention to Beverly Hills or to the Beverly Hilton.

Huebl would not say who hired him.

Read more: SOURCE
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War on drugs ‘should be abandoned’

War on drugs ‘should be abandoned’

Damien McElroy

A study by the International Institute of Strategic Studies found that the global war on narcotics had failed to contain the scourge of illegal stimulants.

The drugs trade has spread to Africa and Eastern Europe in recent decades and entrenched its standing in its traditional strongholds of Asia and the Americas.

Nigel Inkster, the former assistant chief of MI6 and author of the study, said there was a growing revolt against the cost of the fight in developing countries.

Only “vested interests” in countries where illegal drugs are consumed stood in the way of a change in approach, he said.

Research indicated that the authorities would need to stop 70 per cent of all drugs shipments to disrupt the trade. While no figures for the proportion of the trade stopped are available, the figure is almost certainly far below that threshold.

Therefore ramping up the security services fight against drugs is almost certainly doomed to failure.

“As any doctor is told on his first day, you should not just double the dose,” said Mr Inkster, who is the most senior figure to have worked within the fight against narcotics to openly call for a review. “If your initial diagnosis doesn’t work don’t just double the dose.”

The corrosive effects on security of the narco-economy also weighs as an argument for ending the war. “You can’t do counter-insurgency and counter-narcotics simultaneously,” he said. “Our investigation has shown us that the so-called war on drugs fundamentally undermines international security.”

The report, Drugs, Insecurity and Failed States, highlights two alternative systems. Either decriminalisation of all personal possession, as Portugal instituted a decade ago, or a licensing scheme such as that which brought the gin trade under control in London in the 1700s.

Licensing would also allow states to begin to apply the lessons of antismoking campaigns which have curtailed tobacco use.

Taxation, public health messages and social legislation could marginalise drug use.

SOURCE

Tired of being raped? Want his worst fears to be realized? Try the NEW and Improved RAPE-AXE Condom!

Condoms With Teeth Fight Rape In South Africa

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Over 30,000 Rape-Axe condoms are being handed out free at South Africa’s World Cup. While they won’t stop rape, the condoms (worn by women) have jagged-teeth inside to tear penises up, and can only be removed by doctors.

Sounds grim, but then I imagine rape isn’t any fun for the woman either. The inventor, Dr Sonnet Ehlers, was inspired to create the painful condom after she met a woman who’d been raped. The woman apparently told Ehlers “if only I had teeth down there,” which encouraged her to look at ways to make men regret their actions.

Women fearful of being raped can insert the Rape-Axe condom inside themselves like a diaphragm or tampon. If her worst fears come true, and a man attempts to rape her, the Rape-Axe’s inside hooks attach themselves to the penis and don’t come off, instead getting even tighter and stopping the man from being able to urinate. The only way to remove it is by seeing a doctor—which will obviously help with prosecution.

After the World Cup, Ehlers will be selling the Rape-Axe condoms for $2 each.

Rise in British Cocaine Use May Have Peaked…….maybe

Rise in use of cocaine has peaked, says EU drug agency report

Alan Travis,

According to the EU’s drugs agency, the rise in the use of cocaine across Europe over the past decade has peaked.

The relentless rise in the use of cocaine across Europe over the past decade has peaked as a result of the austere economic climate, according to the European Union’s drug agency.

However, the UK remains at the top of the European league table for cocaine use – as it has for seven out of the last eight years – despite the bubble bursting.

The annual report from the Lisbon-based European monitoring centre for drugs and drug addiction, published on Tuesday, shows illicit drug use across the EU relatively stable, with positive signs that cocaine use has peaked and cannabis use among young people continuing to decline.

But the agency says this encouraging picture is being offset by new threats from ‘legal highs’ and other synthetic drugs. It says that 39 new substances have been identified so far this year via the European early warning system on top of the 41 notified for the whole of 2010.

There are no signs of decline in their use and more than 150 new substances are being monitored by the authorities.

The EU drugs agency said this rapid appearance of new substances is being driven by a record 600 online retailers willing to despatch an order for what purports to be ‘psychoactive substances’ to at least one other EU state. The total includes 80 online shops selling mephedrone based in the UK.

The July survey that found these retailers also discovered a much wider variety of products. Many also displayed prominent disclaimers such as ‘not for human consumption’ or ‘for use only as plant food’. Others exercised caution by placing restrictions on delivery.

Ireland and Poland have both rapidly passed legislation limiting the open sale of ‘legal highs’. Health inspectors in Poland closed down 1,200 stores last year.

The report says cocaine has established itself over the past decade as the most popular stimulant drug across Europe with more than 4 million people using it every year.

“But the new data presented today raises the question as to whether its popularity has now peaked,
” it adds. “The financial burden associated with regular cocaine use may make it a less attractive option in countries where austerity is now the order of the day.”

Experts say the bubble has burst because the average retail price for cocaine has reached between 50 and 80 euros per gram. There is also a growing recognition of the problems linked to cocaine use that has tarnished its image as an affluent lifestyle drug.

The EU data shows cocaine use by young adults, aged 15 to 34, in the UK has dipped from 6.1% in 2009 to 4.8% in 2010, with similar declines in Spain, Italy and Denmark.

The fall in popularity also echoes recent trends in Canada and the US, which have cocaine popularity levels below those in Britain.

Cannabis remains Europe’s most popular illicit drug with 78 million – or 20% of all Europeans – having tried it. Around 22.5 million Europeans used cannabis in the last year but its popularity is in sharp decline among schoolchildren.

A link with declining levels of cigarette smoking, changing fashions and the easy availability of other drugs may all lie behind the decline, said the experts. The proportion of schoolchildren in England who have ever tried cannabis has almost halved from 40% in 2000 to 22% last year.

Wolfgang Gotz, the EU drugs agency director, said the drugs market was quick to adapt to threats and opportunities: “This is reflected, not only in the sheer number of new substances appearing on the market, but also in their diversity and in how they are produced, distributed and marketed,” he said.

“We need a proactive strategy that allows us to identify new drugs and emerging trends so that we can anticipate their potential implications.”

He warned that individual national efforts were likely to prove ineffective without a co-ordinated response across Europe.

SOURCE

High IQ linked to drug use

High IQ linked to drug use

The “Just Say No” generation was often told by parents and teachers that intelligent people didn’t use drugs. Turns out, the adults may have been wrong.

A new British study finds children with high IQs are more likely to use drugs as adults than people who score low on IQ tests as children. The data come from the 1970 British Cohort Study, which has been following thousands of people over decades. The kids’ IQs were tested at the ages of 5, 10 and 16. The study also asked about drug use and looked at education and other socioeconomic factors. Then when participants turned 30, they were asked whether they had used drugs such as marijuana, cocaine and heroin in the past year.

Researchers discovered men with high childhood IQs were up to two times more likely to use illegal drugs than their lower-scoring counterparts. Girls with high IQs were up to three times more likely to use drugs as adults. A high IQ is defined as a score between 107 and 158. An average IQ is 100. The study appears in the Journal of Epidemiology and Community Health.

The lead researcher says he isn’t surprised by the findings. “Previous research found for the most part people with high IQs lead a healthy life, but that they are more likely to drink to excess as adults,” says James White a psychologist at Cardiff University in the United Kingdom.

It’s not clear why people with high childhood IQs are more likely to use illegal drugs. “We suspect they may be more open to new experiences and are more sensation seeking,” says White. In the paper, White and his co-author also mention other studies that find high IQ kids may use drugs because they are bored or to cope with being different.

That seems to ring true for one of my childhood classmates. Tracey Helton Mitchell was one of the smartest kids in my middle school. But, by the time she was in her early 20’s, Tracey was a heroin addict. I found out while flipping channels one sleepless night and stumbled upon the documentary “Black Tar Heroin.

“I was confident in my abilities but there was a dissonance,”
says Tracey, with whom I recently reconnected. “No matter what I did, what I said, where I went, I was never comfortable with the shell I carried called myself.”

PECAN: People choose false realities for their own reasons. Good or Bad, is the government the best authority to determine how you live? Is imprisonment and a lack of future just?

For far too long we have witnessed the destructive force of the American WAR ON DRUGS. A War that has destroyed countless lives while ensuring violence and crime continue.

According to the Drug Factbook preconceived notions of drugs are rarely correct. The Drug War is and will always be a failure. The real “Drug Dealers” are the reprobates who run our nation. Pharmaceutical companies monopolize the market and ensure competition remains illegal. The system is supported by the “Rule of Law” and a Police Force who will do anything to propagate the War including planting of evidence .

Drug abusers are in need of counseling not jail. We need to listen not imprison.

SOURCE

If looks could Kill……..and eat you

Ex-Model Who Killed and Ate Hubby Seeks Parole Egypt native says husband raped her

By Greg Wilson

Omaima Aree Nelson, a former model who murdered and ate her husband, wants to get out of prison early.

A former model who killed, cooked and ate her husband 20 years ago will make a bid for freedom next week.

Omaima Aree Nelson is slated to appear before a California parole board to plead for an early release from Chowchilla State Prison, where she is serving 27 years to life, according to KTLA-TV.


Nelson killed her 56-year-old husband, William Nelson, over Thanksgiving weekend in 1991, just amonth after they married. She had come to the U.S. five years earlier from Egypt, where she worked as a model and nanny.

“It was the most gruesome case I saw,” Former Costa Mesa Police Sgt. Bob Phillips told the Los Angeles Times. “She did not seem like a person that was coherent.”

At the time of her arrest, Phillips told the Times, “Omaima Nelson is the most bizarre and sick individual I’ve had the occasion to meet. No one needs to look to the Dahmers of Milwaukee or the Hannibal Lecters of the screen. A new predator has emerged, named Omaima.

Nelson claimed at trial she had been abused and her husband had raped her the night before she killed him in their Costa Mesa apartment, according to the Los Angeles Times. After murdering him, Nelson boiled her husband’s head on the stove and fried his hands in oil, the Daily Pilot reported.

She once admitted, but now denies, dipping his body in barbecue sauce. Neighbors at the time said the garbage disposal was on for “a long time” and “constant chopping sounds” were coming from the home, according to the Daily Pilot newspaper.

“Of course, she says that [she doesn’t remember] because the parole board doesn’t want to let a cannibal out,” Senior Deputy District Attorney Randy Pawloski told the Daily Pilot.

Nelson offered ex-boyfriends $75,000 to help her dispose of some of the body parts, according to police. She found no takers and was arrested Dec. 2, 1991, after police found trash bags containing human body parts in the couple’s apartment and in the victim’s Corvette.


SOURCE

Drugs, the Illegality of Healing and Pharmageddon

Drugs, the Illegality of Healing and Pharmageddon

by Sayer Ji, founder of GreenMedInfo.com

To most of us, the word “drug” conjures varied, if not diametrically opposed images and connotations. On the one hand, “drugs” are illegal substances, associated with addiction, bodily harm, crime, and other unpleasant experiences. These drugs include cocaine, amphetamine, marijuana and heroin, and are generally not considered to have medicinal effects. On the other hand, prescribed or over the counter “drugs” are associated with treating or preventing disease, regulated by the FDA and administered legally to the public in carefully meted doses by doctors. No matter which way you slice it, Americans have the most voracious appetite for drugs on the planet, consuming approximately 700 billion dollars worth of prescribed, over-the-counter and illegal drugs, annually.

The distinction between these two meanings of the word drug may hold hard and fast from the perspective of politics, the law, media imaging and ordinary parlance, but not necessarily from the perspective of biology and pharmacology. Take amphetamine, for instance. Although amphetamine is one of the most addictive and metabolically poisonous drugs found on the street today and responsible for thousands of deaths a year, it is approved by the FDA for the treatment of attention deficit disorder, weight loss, depression and narcolepsy in branded forms such as Adderall, Ritalin and Dexedrine. Marijuana, on the other hand, which has an extraordinary safety profile, and which has been studied for decades for its extensive medical applications, remains illegal throughout the United States and is not approved for prescription as medicine. Politics, economics and social prejudices are the primary reason why certain substances attain approval or disapproval as drugs, not the inherent nature of the substance itself, as one would expect in a civilized society.

The difference between a “good” and a “bad” drug can depend entirely upon the social context within which a chemical like amphetamine is ingested. If acquired on the street within the context of the drug dealer/junky relationship it is a “fix” (albeit self-medication, no matter how misguided). If ingested upon a doctor’s request for a diagnosable disorder, it is considered “medicine.” The former context is socially sanctified; the latter is socially vilified. Ultimately, neither situation can transcend the fact that amphetamine will only offer temporary relief from whatever emptiness or imbalance the drug was supposed to fix or cover up. Nothing within the amphetamine itself will address the underlying food allergies, nutritional deficiencies, emotional issues that may be causing the deficit in attention, sluggish metabolism, inability to sleep or depressive emotional state. In fact, long term amphetamine use is notorious for causing the very thing that it would temporarily remedy: suicidal depression, exhaustion to the point of sudden death, inability to focus, etc.

In some cases the street form of a drug is actually safer than its prescribed form. For instance, the synthetic opioid known in prescription form as Fentanyl is 40 times MORE powerful/addictive than heroin. However the main point of this article is not to decompose the rather essential boundaries that exist between “good” and “bad” drugs, as without them, society as we know it today would drift into greater chaos. Rather, we are going to focus on the way in which the positive sense of the word drug as medicine has been effectively removed from the grasp of foods and dietary supplements – as far as the FDA is concerned – forever.

According to the FDA’s legal definition of a drug, anything that “diagnoses, cures, mitigates, treats, or prevents a disease” is defined as a drug. The problem with this definition is that there are numerous substances, as readily available and benign as found on our spice racks, which have been proven to mitigate, prevent and in some cases CURE disease, and which CAN NOT be called DRUGS according to the FDA. How can this be? Well, the FDA has Godlike power insofar as it has to grant a healing substance its official approval for it to be considered to have legitimate application in the treatment of disease. And historically the FDA has required very expensive clinical studies (approximately $100 million per drug) which are out of the grasp of any interest who might want to demonstrate the efficacy of a non-patentable and therefore unprofitable herb, food or spice.

If Hippocrates, the founder of modern medicine, were alive today, he would be forced to qualify himself by saying: “Seek FDA approval for permission to let food be thy medicine.”

The common kitchen spice Turmeric is a perfect example of this extraordinary hypocrisy. Although one can find over 200 biomedical citations on PubMed (pubmed.gov) discussing Turmeric’s ability to cause apoptosis (programmed cell death) in cancer cells, it has not received the FDA’s approval as a drug in the treatment of cancer. With over a million cases of cancer diagnosed annually in America, wouldn’t it be sensible for the FDA to approve the use of a substance with such extraordinary scientific backing and consensus on its effectiveness AND safety? And if not as a pimary chemotoxic treatment, than at the very least as an adjunctive therapy? Sadly, the likely reason this miraculous substance has not been made available to cancer sufferers today is because it can be grown in one’s back yard for free!

Here we have the fundamental point. The FDA’s definition of a drug is not descriptive, but is a persuasive definition which purports to describe the “true” or “commonly accepted” meaning of a term, while in reality stipulating a meaning that serves only the interests of the drug companies it so spinelessly serves. If an herb can not be converted into a proprietary, profitable, patentable commodity, it will forever be barred from attaining the legitimacy of a “drug,” no matter how effective it is at treating disease. When drug companies do manage to produce an extract of a whole herb, they almost invariably make the same fatal error: they equate the healing force of the whole plant with only certain decomposed isolates or ‘mono-chemicals’ found within this living, infinitely complex totality. Even worse, they tinker with these isolates to ensure that they are unique enough to derive a patent, with the unfortunate outcome that the new chemical analogue is now biologically unprecedented. This folly results in profound side effects and toxicity, and serves only one objective: to ensure the 20 year market exclusivity that a FDA awarded patent affords. One can play God by isolating and reproducing facsimiles of a component of a complex living organism such as Turmeric.

But the isolate will never compare to the safety and healing power of the whole herb, produced by Mother Nature Herself; rather, it is more likely to behave like Mary Shelly’s Frankenstein, with uncontrollable and violent side effects.

And this is another key point: Mother Nature does not grant patents, even though her formulas are proprietary. She will never lend herself to rampant profit making and outlandish claims, nor will she make the mechanism of her healing perfectly intelligible vis-à-vis the scientific method. It is commodity and profit driven medicine, with its underlying emphasis on perverting the scientific method to serve economic objectives that concerns itself with patent exclusivities, hyperbolic claims and profit as an end unto itself. Rather than lament this fact, I have decided to celebrate it. If whole food supplements, herbs and vitamins are forever exiled from the would-be legitimacy of the allopathic pharmacopoeia, then so be it! This can not obviate the healing gifts that issue prolifically and freely from the Lap of Nature herself; nor does it negate that birthright of health which we all participate in, knowingly and unknowingly. Rather, this exclusion of what works and is right, and good, from the compass and concern of orthodox medical principle and practice, is an indication of a complete failure in credibility of the allopathic system as a whole, and which has earned it its disgraceful nickname: the Disestablishment. Until food is allowed to be considered medicine once again, orthodox medical can not rightly claim to be interested in healing disease. Thomas Edison left us with a sage premonition of a possible future that may still remain within our grasp, when he wrote:

“The doctor of the future will give no medicine but will interest his patients in the care of the human frame, in diet, and in the cause and prevention of human disease.”

SOURCE

If at first you don’t succeed……throw another billion at it.

Name one government program that for 40 years has failed to achieve any of its goals, yet receives bigger and bigger budgets every year. If you said “the War on Drugs,” you’ve been paying attention.

The Obama Administration is unable to show that the billions of dollar spent in the WAR ON DRUGS have significantly affected the flow of illicit substances into the United States, according to two government reports and outside experts.

The reports specifically criticize the government’s growing use of U.S. contractors, which were paid more than $3 billion to train local prosecutors and police, help eradicate coca fields, and operate surveillance equipment in the battle against the expanding drug trade in Latin America over the past five years, reports Brian Bennett of the Los Angeles Times.

“We are wasting tax dollars and throwing money at a problem without even knowing what we are getting in return,” said Sen. Claire McCaskill (D-MO), who chairs the Senate subcommittee that wrote one of the reports, which was released on Wednesday.

Professor Bruce Bagley, University of Miami: “I think we have wasted our money hugely”

?”I think we have wasted our money hugely,” said Bruce Bagley, an expert in U.S. anti-narcotics efforts. “The effort has had corrosive effects on every country it has touched,” said Bagley, who chairs international studies at the University of Miami at Coral Gables, Florida.

Predictably, Obama Administration officials deny reports that U.S. efforts have failed to reduce drug production and smuggling in Latin America.

White House officials claim the expanding U.S. anti-drug effort occupies a “growing portion” of time for President Obama’s national security team, even though it doesn’t get many Congressional hearings or headlines.

The majority of wasted American counter-narcotics dollars are awarded to five big corporations: DynCorp, Lockheed Martin, Raytheon, ITT and ARINC, according to the report for the contracting oversight committee, part of the Senate Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs Committee.

Counter-narcotics contract spending increased by 32 percent over the five-year period from $482 million in 2005 to $635 million in 2009. Falls Church, Va., based DynCorp got the biggest piece of the wasted pie, a whopping $1.1 billion.

Sen. Claire McCaskill: “We are wasting tax dollars and throwing money at a problem without even knowing what we are getting in return”

?These contractors have plenty of ways to waste your tax money. They train local police and investigators in anti-drug methods, provide logistical support to intelligence collection centers, and fly airplanes and helicopters that spray herbicides to supposedly eradicate coca crops grown to produce cocaine.

The Department of Defense has wasted $6.1 billion of tax money since 2005 to help spot planes and boats headed north to the U.S. with drug payloads, as well as on surveillance and other intelligence operations.

Some of the expenses are “difficult to characterize,” according to Senate staff members, which is government-speak for “OK, you caught us wasting money again.” The Army wasted $75,000 for paintball supplies for “training exercises” in 2007, for example, and $5,000 for what the military listed as “rubber ducks.

The “ducks” are rubber replicas of M-16 rifles that are used in training exercises, a Pentagon spokesman claimed.

Even the Defense Department described its own system for tracking these contracts as “error prone,” according to the Senate report, which also says the department doesn’t have reliable data about “how successful” its efforts have been. Go figure.

In a separate report last month by the U.S. Government Accountability Office, the investigative arm of Congress, there is the conclusion that the State Department “does not have a centralized inventory of counter-narcotics contracts” and said the department does not evaluate the overall success of its counter-narcotics program.

“It’s become increasingly clear that our efforts to rein in the narcotics trade in Latin America, especially as it relates to the government’s use of contractors, have largely failed,” Sen. McCaskill said.

The latest criticism of the United States’ War On Drugs comes just a week after a high-profile group of world leaders called the global Drug War a costly failure.

The group, which included former United Nations Secretary General Kofi Annan and past presidents of Mexico, Brazil and Colombia, recommended that regional governments try legalizing and regulating drugs to help stop the flood of cash going to drug cartels and other organized crime groups.

US protects the Drug Trade

James Gregory, a Pentagon spokesman, demonstrated his willingness to lie his ass off by claiming the Defense Department’s efforts against drugs “have been among the most successful and cost-effective programs” in decades.

“By any reasonable assessment, the U.S. has received ample strategic national security benefits in return for its investments in this area,
” said Gregory, who seems to inhabit a particularly improbable alternate reality.

Back in the real world, the only effects most objective observers can see run along these lines: Backed by the United States, Mexico’s stepped-up Drug War has had the unintended effect of pushing drug cartels deeper into Central America, causing violence to soar in Guatemala, Honduras and El Salvador.

Another effect has been the vast expansion of Orwellain surveillance technology, supposedly to combat drugs, but ever-so-useful to the authoritarian regimes in Central America (and in the United States) in suppressing dissent.

The U.S. is currently focusing on improving its efforts to intercept cellphone and Internet traffic (of “drug cartels,” yeah right) in the region, according to U.S. officials who spoke on condition of anonymity.

During a visit to El Salvador in February, William Brownfield, the head of the State Department’s anti-drug programs, opened a wiretapping center in San Salvador, as well as an office to share fingerprints and other data with U.S. law enforcement.

SOURCE

Pssssstttt pass me that snickers!

By Fiona Macrae

Junk food is as addictive as heroin and cocaine, scientists say.

Studies show that the fat, salt and sugar rush of fast food affects has the same effect on the brain as hard drugs.

The findings have led to calls for cigarette-style health warnings to be placed on boxes and wrappers – and even the suggestion that manufacturers could be sued for knowingly putting people’s health at risk.


The research comes as Britain fights a rising tide of obesity, with weight loss surgery alone costing the NHS more than £32million a year.

The idea that junk food is addictive is fast becoming accepted by researchers, says this week’s New Scientist.

The first hint came from American studies on rats showing that those fed on syrup developed brain and behaviour changes similar to rodents hooked on morphine.

Crucially, the animals released the pleasure-seeking brain chemical dopamine after every sugar hit – a hallmark of drug addiction.

More…

* Doctors design Dash diet that cuts heart attack risk by ‘almost a fifth’

Allowing rats to binge on bacon, sausage, icing and chocolate also caused ‘very, very striking’ changes to the brain,similar to those seen with cocaine and heroin.

Even electric shocks did not deter them from getting their junk food ‘fix’.

And when people are shown pictures of their favourite foods, a decision-making area of the brain called the orbital frontal cortex experiences a surge of dopamine. The same area is activated when cocaine addicts are shown a bag of white power.

New Scientist says: ‘There is now compelling evidence that foods high in sugar, fat and salt – as most junk foods are – can alter your brain chemistry in much the same way as highly addictive drugs such as cocaine and heroin.’

The food industry says that junk food is only addictive to a ‘certain subset of consumers who don’t exhibit the discipline required’.

Hank Cardello, a former Coca Cola executive, says solutions include giving tax relief to companies making healthy foods.

He added: ‘People aren’t going to change their behaviour. To me it’s about getting calories of the streets.’

Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/health/article-1308106/Calls-cigarette-style-health-warnings-junk-food-addictive-heroin-cocaine.html#ixzz0yQJAnOTn