Tag Archives: electromagnetic pulse

Frying tonight

Frying tonight

BULLETS and bombs are so 20th-century. The wars of the 21st will be dominated by ray guns. That, at least, is the vision of a band of military technologists who are building weapons that work by zapping the enemy’s electronics, rather than blowing him to bits. The result could be conflict that is less bloody, yet more effective, than what is now seen as conventional battle.

Electromagnetic weapons, to give these ray guns their proper name, are inspired by the cold-war idea of using the radio-frequency energy released by an atom bomb exploded high in the atmosphere to burn out an enemy’s electrical grid, telephone network and possibly even the wiring of his motor vehicles, by inducing a sudden surge of electricity in the cables that run these things.

That idea, fortunately, was never tried in earnest (though some tests were carried out). But, by thinking smaller, military planners have developed weapons that use a similar principle, without the need for a nuclear explosion. Instead, they create their electromagnetic pulses with magnetrons, the microwave generators at the hearts of radar sets (and also of microwave ovens). The result is kit that can take down enemy missiles and aircraft, stop tanks in their tracks and bring speedboats to a halt. It can also scare away soldiers without actually killing them.

Many electromagnetic weapons do, indeed, look like radars, at least to non-expert eyes. America’s air force is developing a range of them based on a type of radar called an active electronically scanned array (AESA). When acting as a normal radar, an AESA broadcasts its microwaves over a wide area. At the touch of a button, however, all of its energy can be focused onto a single point. If that point coincides with an incoming missile or aircraft, the target’s electronics will be zapped.

Small AESAs—those light enough to fit on a plane such as a joint strike fighter (F-35)—are probably restricted to zapping air-to-air and surface-to-air missiles (the air force is understandably reticent about supplying details of their capabilities). Ground- or ship-based kit can draw more power. This will be able to attack both ballistic missiles and aircraft, whose electronics tend to be better shielded.

In the case of the F-35, then, this sort of electromagnetic artillery is mainly defensive. But another plane, the Boeing Growler, uses electromagnetics as offensive weapons. The Growler, which first saw action in Iraq in 2010 and has been extensively (though discreetly) deployed during the NATO air war against Colonel Qaddafi’s forces in Libya, is a souped-up version of the Super Hornet. It is fitted with five pods: two under each wing and one under the fuselage. Some pods contain AESAs or similar electromagnetic weapons. Others have eavesdropping equipment inside them. In combination, the pods can be used either to spy on enemy communications or to destroy them; to suppress anti-aircraft fire; to disable the electronics of ground vehicles; and to make life so hazardous for enemy aircraft that they dare not fly (and probably to shoot them down electronically, too, though no one will confirm this). The Growler is able to keep its weapons charged up and humming by lowering special turbines into the airstream that rushes past the plane when it is flying. America has ordered 114 of the planes, and has taken delivery of 53.

By land, sea and air

Nor are aircraft the only vehicles from which destructive electromagnetic pulses can be launched. BAE Systems, a British defence firm, is building a ship-mounted electromagnetic gun. The High-Powered Microwave, as it is called, is reported by Aviation Week to be powerful enough to disable all of the motors in a swarm of up to 30 speedboats. Ships fitted with such devices would never be subject to the sort of attack that damaged USS Cole in 2000, when an al-Qaeda boat loaded with explosives rammed it. A gun like this would also be useful for stopping pirate attacks against commercial shipping.

Land vehicles, too, will soon be fitted with electromagnetic cannon. In 2013 America hopes to deploy the Radio-Frequency Vehicle Stopper. This device, developed at the Joint Non-Lethal Weapons Directorate in Quantico, Virginia, is a microwave transmitter the size and shape of a small satellite dish that pivots on top of an armoured car. When aimed at another vehicle, it causes that vehicle’s engine to stall.

This gentle way of handling the enemy—stopping his speedboats, stalling his tanks—has surprising advantages. For example, it expands the range of targets that can be attacked. Some favourite tricks of modern warfare, such as building communications centres in hospitals, or protecting sites with civilian “human shields”, cease to be effective if it is simply the electronics of the equipment being attacked that are destroyed. Though disabling an aircraft’s avionics will obviously cause it to crash, in many other cases, no direct harm is done to people at all.

The logical conclusion of all this is a so-called “human-safe” missile, which carries an electromagnetic gun instead of an explosive warhead. Such a missile is being developed at Kirtland Air Force Base in New Mexico, and will soon be tested at the White Sands Missile Range.

There is, however, at least one electromagnetic weapon that is designed to attack enemy soldiers directly—though with the intention of driving them off, rather than killing them. This weapon, which is called the Active Denial System, has been developed by the Joint Non-Lethal Weapons Directorate, in collaboration with Raytheon. It works by heating the moisture in a person’s skin to the point where it feels, according to Kelley Hughes, an official at the directorate who volunteered to act as a guinea pig, like opening a hot oven. People’s reaction, when hit by the beam, is usually to flee. The beam’s range is several hundred metres.

Such anti-personnel weapons are controversial. Tests on monkeys, including ones in which the animals’ eyes were held open to check that the beam does not blind, suggest it causes no permanent damage. But when a vehicle-mounted Active Denial System was sent to Afghanistan in May 2010, it was eventually shipped back home without being used. The defence department will not say exactly why. The suspicion, though, is that weapons like the Active Denial System really are reminiscent in many minds of the ray guns of science fiction, and that using them in combat would be a PR mistake. Disabling communications and destroying missiles is one thing. Using heat-rays on the enemy might look bad in the newspapers, and put civilians off their breakfast.

Cold showers are good for you

To every action there is, of course, an equal and opposite reaction, and researchers are just as busy designing ways of foiling electromagnetic weapons as they are developing them. Most such foils are types of Faraday cage—named after the 19th-century investigator who did much of the fundamental research on electromagnetism.

A Faraday cage is a shield of conductive material that stops electromagnetic radiation penetrating. Such shields need not be heavy. Nickel- and copper-coated polyester mesh is a good starting point. Metallised textiles—chemically treated for greater conductivity—are also used. But Faraday cages can be costly. EMP-tronic, a firm based in Morarp, Sweden, has developed such shielding, initially for the Gripen, a Swedish fighter jet. It will shield buildings too, though, for a suitable consideration. To cover one a mere 20 metres square with a copper-mesh Faraday cage the firm charges €300,000 ($400,000).

Shielding buildings may soon become less expensive than that. At least two groups of scientists—one at the National Research Council Canada and the other at Global Contour, a firm in Texas—are developing electrically conductive cement that will block electromagnetic pulses. Global Contour’s mixture, which includes fibres of steel and carbon, as well as a special ingredient that the firm will not disclose, would add only $20 to the $150 per cubic metre, or thereabouts, which ordinary concrete costs.

The arms race to protect small vehicles and buildings against electromagnetic warfare, then, has already begun. Protecting ships, however, requires lateral thinking. For obvious reasons, they cannot be encased in concrete. And building a conventional Faraday cage round a naval vessel would be horribly expensive.

Daniel Tam, of the Space and Naval Warfare Systems Command in San Diego, thinks he has a way to get round that. He proposes to use the electrical conductivity of the sodium and chloride ions in seawater to create a novel type of Faraday cage. A shroud of seawater around a ship, thrown up by special pumps and hoses if the vessel came under electromagnetic attack, would do the trick, he reckons.

It is an ambitious idea. Whether it works or not, it shows how much the nature of modern belligerency is changing. Bombs and bullets will always have their place, of course. But the thought that a cold shower could protect a ship from attack is almost surreal.

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Spanish Authorities using a new EMP weapon on Citizens?

Spanish Authorities using a new EMP weapon on Citizens?

By Diarmaid O Seigefriede

In Spain three weeks ago in a town called Alzira population (maybe about 50,000 people) 30 kilometres south of Malaga a big shot politician flew in by helicopter. The landing zone was in the local police station which was based close the centre of the town .The politician was coming to the town to sort out the compensation claims and worries of the peoples where a nearby local forest and bush fire had damaged property .These forest and bush fires are a common event in the dry October end of summer tinderbox Spanish country side.

The difference this time was that the local police force used some high tech device from the police station that caused most all electronic items within 500 meters of the police station to be knocked out for about one hour. The Police told the locals it was a safety wave .This safety wave
effect lasted for about one hour in the early morning times while the Helicopter flew in and about one hour later flew out. The effects were no mobile phones in that 500 meter radius of the police station would work. No cars within that field effect could be made to start their engines. All other cars outside the region were not allowed to enter this safety wave region so it’s not known if they
can knock out engines that were running at the time of the safety wave event.

All satellite TV and cable TV devices in the safety wave region were knocked out also. We are talking a region festooned with multi story apartment blocks with hundreds if not thousands of normal Spanish going about their normal lives unaware that there was some sort of test of a safety wave device about to be given to them.

There seems to have been other unconfirmed issues suggesting pace makers and other medical devices were effected both within the safety wave region and possibly further than the safety wave field. There seemed to have been a local spike in death rates that day and for several days it was rumoured that the local funeral homes had a spike in burials.

There was no forewarning to the locals about this Police safety wave machines existence or its deployment for that day. Only under severe discontent from the locals suffering some bizarre
event early morning in the central part of town forced the police to tell the locals they deployed this safety wave machine. The local and Spanish Main stream media didn’t mention this event which is pretty much the norm in Spain where the main stream media tows the political commands from the government. I was passing through the town a few days after the event to visit friends and got the story from the locals who were not happy to be the receiving end of these high tech devices that they had no idea even existed in their obscure stick Ville town in Spain.

This device is probably an offshoot of the Iraq war where to defend helicopters landing in the city centres from missiles and other attacks. If a jamming signal jams the incoming missiles electronics there is an increased chance that the missile will miss the target be it helicopters or the local police /army bases or even the Parliament or town halls.

Any attempt to launch missiles within the 500 meter radius protection zone will probably mean the missiles trigger and guidance systems will fail. Any attempt to use car bombs or ramming the target with modern cars or trucks could be more likely to fail. The bombs trigger systems could fail also. However older fashioned cars and trucks which don’t use electronic systems could be more able to get past these safety wave devices and bomb and IED trigger systems can be made to resist safety waves using shielding systems. Most modern new cars from about 1999 to 2000 are also now running using electronic systems and are actually designed to cause the car engines to quit when the police trigger the safety wave devices near to them. These smaller mostly hand held devices that police cars can use are to disable cars within 100 meters of the cop car with the safety wave
devices. All police car in modern European countries could soon like the USA police cars which are now able to stop most all car chases using these hand held safety wave devices. The Police car in the USA in car chases now triggers the safety wave device and the modern car that is being chased by the USA police car will suffer the motor stopping when its electronic ignition systems receive this signal to stop the engine. The result is the car chase finishes sooner.

However the same safety wave signal from the USA police is causing several other cars within the field of the police car to also stop their motors with no warning and this has caused accidents to innocent parties who were not involved in the car chases. This hand held cop car safety wave system could also lead to more motorway pile ups like the recent London UK M25 crash that killed
several peoples. This larger safety wave jamming device will probably affect most all electronic devices within the protection zone estimated to be 500 meters radius. It is probably some sort of massive EMP (Electromagnetic pulse) devise that creates a local magnetic pulse causing electronic devices that are not protected from this safety wave devise to fail. The biggest risk from cops having these devices in Europe or elsewhere and randomly using them is that anybody on pacemakers and
intricate medical devices like diabetic pumps could suffer injuries or death from an unannounced use of this safety wave machines in their regions. If the police forces supply some warning such as one day in advance their intention to deploy the safety wave the bad guys Al-CIA-DA (Al Qaeda) would receive forewarning a big politician is coming to town. The Al Qaeda might know ways to circumvent the safety wave from their CIA training manual meant for the rent a bogie man Al Qaeda terrorists .
They Al Qaeda know for instance not to use no electronic solutions for attacks The CIA manuals for Al Qaeda would suggest use primitive mortar fire or use older vehicles for ramming targets and shield electronics for IED and detonators for bombs .

Until more information arrives it could be advisable for all peoples on pace makers or similar medical devices to try not to live beside sensitive targets like Political centres, town halls, army or police stations. We can assume that all of these places in Europe will get these safety wave devices devises if they don’t already have them. Expect more false flag attacks from AL-CIA-DA units to European
targets to drag Europe into a war with Iran and Syria as the USA army forces hasn’t sufficient army strength to do these wars and will try to ensure Europe fights these wars alongside Israel and the USA. We can also assume these safety wave devices will increase their range from the present known 500 meters. If enough points in the towns have these safety wave devices the whole town will become a non-electronic run town for the duration of the safety wave which could be made to last weeks or months if the powers to be decide to use them in that way. Even Hospitals which would generally not have EMP or safety wave protected equipment could suffer huge spikes in death and injury rate while a safety wave is pressed into service nearby to them

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SANCTIONS: The Tool of the Powerless

North Korea Tests ‘Super-EMP’ Nuke

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By Ken Timmerman

Gary Samore, a top Obama administration national security official, warned of new sanctions if North Korea conducted a third round of nuclear tests on Monday, as reports surfaced that North Korea has miniaturized its nuclear warheads so they can be delivered by ballistic missile.

North Korea’s last round of tests, conducted in May 2009, appear to have included a “super-EMP” weapon, capable of emitting enough gamma rays to disable the electric power grid across most of the lower 48 states, says Dr. Peter Vincent Pry, a former CIA nuclear weapons analyst and president of EMPact America, a citizens lobbying group.

Samore, who handles arms control and non-proliferation issues, warned that “additional strong sanctions will be imposed on the North with the support of Russia and China.”

North Korea’s nuclear tests have been dismissed as failures by some analysts because of their low explosive yield. But Dr. Pry believes they bore the “signature” of the Russian-designed “super-EMP” weapon, capable of emitting more gamma radiation than a 25-megaton nuclear weapon.

Pry believes the U.S. intelligence community was expecting North Korea to test a first generation implosion device with an explosive yield of 10 to 20 kilotons, similar to the bomb the U.S. exploded over Nagasaki in 1945. He said, “So when they saw one that put off just three kilotons, they said it failed. That is so implausible.”

The technology for producing a first generation implosion weapon has been around since 1945, and is thoroughly described in open source literature.

South Korean defense minister, Kim Kwan-jin, told his country’s parliament on Monday that North Korea had succeeded in miniaturizing its nuclear weapons design, allowing them to place a nuclear warhead on a ballistic missile.

His analysis coincided with Congressional testimony in March by Lt. Gen. Ronald L. Burgess, director of the Defense Intelligence Agency, who stated that North Korea “may now have several plutonium-based warheads that it can deliver by ballistic missiles.

The Soviet Union conducted an atmospheric test of an EMP weapon in 1962 over Kazakhstan whose pulse wave set on fire a power station 300 kilometers away and destroyed it within 10 seconds.

Such a weapon — equal to a massive solar flare such as the “solar maxima” predicted by NASA to occur in 2012 — poses “substantial risk to equipment and operation of the nation’s power grid and under extreme conditions could result in major long term electrical outages,” said Joseph McClelland of the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission in Senate testimony last month.

Pry said that a group of Russian nuclear weapons scientists approached him in 2004 when he served as staff director of the Commission to Assess the Threat to the United States from Electromagnetic Pulse (EMP) Attack, to warn the United States that the technology to make that weapon “had leaked” to North Korea, and possibly to Iran.

They told us that Russian scientists had gone to North Korea to work on building the super-EMP weapon,” Pry told Newsmax. “The North Koreans appear to have tested it in 2006 and again in 2009.”

North Korea’s main partner in its nuclear weapons and ballistic missile programs is Iran. Dr. William Graham, chairman of the Commission to Assess the Threat to the United States from Electromagnetic Pulse (EMP) Attack, warned Congress three years ago that Iran had conducted missile launches in an EMP mode, detonating them high in the atmosphere.

Rep. Trent Franks, R-Ariz., has introduced legislation known as the SHIELD Act that would require U.S. utilities to harden large transformers and other key elements of the nation’s power grid to protect them from a devastating EMP attack or a geomagnetic storm.

The House last year passed a similar measure by unanimous consent, but the bill died in the Senate, where Sen. Jeff Bingaman, D, N.M., and Sen. Lisa Murkowski, R-Ariz., the chair and ranking member of the Senate Energy Committee, insisted that the threat from cyberattack was more dangerous than the possibility of an EMP strike or a solar flare.

John Kappenman, the chief science adviser to the EMP commission, believes it would require just $1 billion to harden an estimated 5,000 power transformers around the country to shield them from the impact of an EMP-like event.

“We built this infrastructure without any awareness of this threat,” he told Newsmax. “We have no design code that takes this threat into account. We’ve been doing everything to design the grid to make it greatly more coupled, and therefore more vulnerable, to this threat.”

He compared the national power grid to a series of giant skyscrapers, “and only now we’ve discovered that it’s located on a big fault line.”

President Obama’s science adviser, John Holdren, warned in a March 10, 2011 Op-Ed co-authored with his British counterpart of the potentially catastrophic impact of a solar maxima event in the next 12 to 18 months.

“Space weather can affect human safety and economies anywhere on our vast wired planet, and blasts of electrically-charged gas traveling from the Sun at up to 5 million miles an hour can strike with little warning,
” Holdren wrote. “Their impact could be big — on the order of $2 trillion during the first year in the United States alone, with a recovery period of 4 to 10 years.”

Rep. Trent Franks, who authored the SHIELD Act, warned of “catastrophic consequences” should Congress fail to act.

“The U.S. society and economy are so critically dependent upon the availability of electricity that a significant collapse of the grid, precipitated by a major natural or man-made EMP event, could result in catastrophic civilian casualties,
” he said. “This vulnerability, if left unaddressed, could have grave, societal altering consequences.”


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