Tag Archives: health

Woman high on ‘bath salts’ dies after attacking child

Munnsville woman allegedly high on ‘bath salts’ dies after attacking child
by Jeremy Ryan

– A Madison County woman alleged to be high on drugs is dead after assaulting her child and receiving a Taser shock while she struggled with police.

According to State Police, around 7:45 p.m. Tuesday, troopers were called to an apartment on North Main Street in the Village of Munnsville for a report of a woman assaulting her three-year-old child. While police were responding to scene, they say Madison County 911 dispatchers received several follow-up reports that the woman was punching and choking the child and had started to attack a neighbor.

When police arrived, they say they found 35-year-old Pamela McCarthy apparently under the influence of “bath salts”, an illegal synthetic drug. Police say Trooper Christopher Budlong attempted to arrest McCarthy, who was “violently combative” and may have been “growling,” according to police and resisted attempts to handcuff her. Budlong used his police-issued pepper spray on McCarthy to no effect, so he then deployed his Taser and was able to handcuff McCarthy with the help of rescue personnel.

Police then say that after McCarthy was taken into custody she went into apparent cardiac arrest. She was taken by ambulance to Oneida Healthcare, where she later died.

At a press conference Wednesday afternoon, State Police said the use of the Taser was justified. Troopers said the woman has a history of using bath salts.

An autopsy was unable to pinpoint the exact cause of death, according to police. It could take several weeks before toxicology results are back.

Wednesday morning, eyewitnesses David and Zachary Bridge told CNY Central’s Jim Kenyon that they saw McCarthy come out of the rear exit of her apartment with the boy in her arms, and tumble down the stairs holding onto the child. They say she began assaulting the child and was yelling incoherently. Witnesses say at one point she was sitting on the pavement spinning and laughing as she was hurting the child. They said the boy’s father intervened and took the child away from McCarthy, at which point she chased a neighbor, Heather Ames, into her apartment and attacked her.

Ames told Kenyon that she fought off the attack, and McCarthy went back out into the parking lot, stripped off all of her clothes, and threatened people passing by.

Witnesses say McCarthy then went back into her apartment and tumbled down the stairs again, this time with her pet pit bull in her arms, and then injured the dog as well. State Police and rescue units showed up at which point McCarthy became combative and resisted arrest. Ames says the Trooper (Budlong) repeatedly told McCarthy to let go of the dog, and pepper-sprayed her to no avail.

At several points, witnesses say McCarthy was warned by Troopers that she would be tased if she did not let go of the dog. After McCarthy was tased and handcuffed, a neighbor informed the Trooper that McCarthy had undergone an operation to place stents in her heart just two days prior to the incident.

All three eyewitnesses Kenyon spoke with said that Trooper Budlong was justified in the way he handled the situation.

Police say the child was taken by ambulance to Upstate University Hospital in Syracuse. He was treated for minor injuries and released to family members.

State Police held a news conference Wednesday afternoon in Oneida. Deputies say Onondaga Medical Examiner’s Office conducted an autopsy, but they were unable to determine the cause and manner of death. Troop D commander Major Rodney Campbell says they are waiting for toxicology test results.

Campbell confirmed that McCarthy was high on bath salts and was not coherent at the time of her death.

The case will be presented to a grand jury, which is standard procedure when a person dies in police custody.

SOURCE

Obama Plans to Dramatically Cut Healthcare Benefits for Troops!

Trashing Tricare

BY: Bill Gertz –

The Obama administration’s proposed defense budget calls for military families and retirees to pay sharply more for their healthcare, while leaving unionized civilian defense workers’ benefits untouched. Bridgeway Senior Healthcare is geared towards presenting comfort and care to all of our residents. For more about this, click here to go to Bridgeway Care and Rehabilitation. The proposal is causing a major rift within the Pentagon, according to U.S. officials. Several congressional aides suggested the move is designed to increase the enrollment in Obamacare’s state-run insurance exchanges. As part of Bridgeway’s cardiology program, our interdisciplinary team works with patients recovering from heart disease or heart surgery. To know more about recovery, then browse around this website.

The disparity in treatment between civilian and uniformed personnel is causing a backlash within the military that could undermine recruitment and retention.

The proposed increases in health care payments by service members, which must be approved by Congress, are part of the Pentagon’s $487 billion cut in spending. It seeks to save $1.8 billion from the Tricare medical system in the fiscal 2013 budget, and $12.9 billion by 2017.

One of the changes that people have not been opposed to is a new pain management solution that will be implemented. It is called cbd oil. The cbd isolate wholesale can be used in many of the same ways as other CBD products such as tinctures or oils. It is safer and more effective than what they are using now, and it should help many disabled veterans to improve their quality of life. To those not familiarized with this medication you can look at this article at ANIPOTS that covers the basics quite well.

Many in Congress are opposing the proposed changes, which would require the passage of new legislation before being put in place.

“We shouldn’t ask our military to pay our bills when we aren’t willing to impose a similar hardship on the rest of the population,” Rep. Howard “Buck” McKeon, chairman of the House Armed Services Committee and a Republican from California, said in a statement to the Washington Free Beacon. “We can’t keep asking those who have given so much to give that much more.”

Administration officials told Congress that one goal of the increased fees is to force military retirees to reduce their involvement in Tricare and eventually opt out of the program in favor of alternatives established by the 2010 Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act, aka Obamacare.

“When they talked to us, they did mention the option of healthcare exchanges under Obamacare. So it’s in their mind,” said a congressional aide involved in the issue.

Military personnel from several of the armed services voiced their opposition to a means-tested tier system for Tricare, prompting Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff Gen. Martin Dempsey to issue a statement Feb. 21.

Dempsey said the military is making tough choices in cutting defense spending. In addition to the $487 billion over 10 years, the Pentagon is facing automatic cuts that could push the total reductions to $1 trillion.

“I want those of you who serve and who have served to know that we’ve heard your concerns, in particular your concern about the tiered enrollment fee structure for Tricare in retirement,” Dempsey said. “You have our commitment that we will continue to review our health care system to make it as responsive, as affordable, and as equitable as possible.”

Under the new plan, the Pentagon would get the bulk of its savings by targeting under-65 and Medicare-eligible military retirees through a tiered increase in annual Tricare premiums that will be based on yearly retirement pay.

Significantly, the plan calls for increases between 30 percent to 78 percent in Tricare annual premiums for the first year. After that, the plan will impose five-year increases ranging from 94 percent to 345 percent—more than 3 times current levels.

According to congressional assessments, a retired Army colonel with a family currently paying $460 a year for health care will pay $2,048.

The new plan hits active duty personnel by increasing co-payments for pharmaceuticals and eliminating incentives for using generic drugs.

The changes are worrying some in the Pentagon who fear it will severely impact efforts to recruit and maintain a high-quality all-volunteer military force. Such benefits have been a key tool for recruiting qualified people and keeping them in uniform.

“Would you stay with a car insurance company that raised your premiums by 345 percent in five years? Probably not,” said the congressional aide. “Would anybody accept their taxes being raised 345 percent in five years? Probably not.”

A second congressional aide said the administration’s approach to the cuts shows a double standard that hurts the military.

“We all recognize that we are in a time of austerity,” this aide said. “But defense has made up to this point 50 percent of deficit reduction cuts that we agreed to, but is only 20 percent of the budget.”

The administration is asking troops to get by without the equipment and force levels needed for global missions. “And now they are going to them again and asking them to pay more for their health care when you’ve held the civilian workforce at DoD and across the federal government virtually harmless in all of these cuts. And it just doesn’t seem fair,” the second aide said.

Spokesmen for the Defense Department and the Joint Chiefs of Staff did not respond to requests for comment on the Tricare increases.

The massive increases beginning next year appear timed to avoid upsetting military voters in a presidential election year, critics of the plan say.

Additionally, the critics said leaving civilian workers’ benefits unchanged while hitting the military reflect the administration’s effort to court labor unions, as government unions are the only segment of organized labor that has increased in recent years.

As part of the increased healthcare costs, the Pentagon also will impose an annual fee for a program called Tricare for Life, a new program that all military retirees automatically must join at age 65. Currently, to enroll in Tricare for Life, retirees pay the equivalent of a monthly Medicare premium.

Under the proposed Pentagon plan, retirees will be hit with an additional annual enrollment fee on top of the monthly premium.

Congressional aides said that despite unanimous support among the military chiefs for the current healthcare changes, some senior officials in the Pentagon are opposing the reforms, in particular the tiered system of healthcare.

“It doesn’t matter what the benefit is, whether it’s commissary, PX, or healthcare, or whatever … under the rationale that if you raise your hand and sign up to serve, you earn a base set of benefits, and it should have nothing to do with your rank when you served, and how much you’re making when you retire,” the first aide said.

Military service organizations are opposing the healthcare changes and say the Pentagon is “means-testing” benefits for service personnel as if they were a social program, and not something earned with 20 or more years of military service.

Retired Navy Capt. Kathryn M. Beasley, of the Military Officers Association of America, said the Military Coalition, 32 military service and veterans groups with an estimated 5 million members, is fighting the proposed healthcare increases, specifically the use of mean-testing for cost increases.

“We think it’s absolutely wrong,” Beasley told the Free Beacon. “This is a breach of faith” for both the active duty and retiree communities.

Congressional hearings are set for next month.

The Veterans of Foreign Wars on Feb. 23 called on all military personnel and the veterans’ community to block the healthcare increases.

“There is no military personnel issue more sacrosanct than pay and benefits,” said Richard L. DeNoyer, head of the 2 million-member VFW. “Any proposal that negatively impacts any quality of life program must be defeated, and that’s why the VFW is asking everyone to join the fight and send a united voice to Congress.”

Senior Air Force leaders are expected to be asked about the health care cost increases during a House Armed Services Committee hearing scheduled for Tuesday.

Congress must pass all the proposed changes into law, as last year’s defense authorization bill preemptively limited how much the Pentagon could increase some Tricare fees, while other fees already were limited in law.

Tricare for Life, Tricare Prime, and Tricare Standard increases must be approved, as well as some of the pharmacy fee increases, congressional aides said.

Current law limits Tricare fee increases to cost of living increases in retirement pay.

SOURCE

Catholic League Poised To Go To War With Obama Over Mandatory Birth Control Payments

Catholic League Poised To Go To War With Obama Over Mandatory Birth Control Payments

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Donohue Says 70 Million Of His Voters Ready To Alter Presidential Election

— Catholic leaders upped the ante Monday, threatening to challenge the Obama administration over a provision of the new health care law that would require all employers, including religious institutions, to pay for birth control.

As CBS 2’s Marcia Kramer reports, it could affect the presidential elections.

Catholic leaders are furious and determined to harness the voting power of the nation’s 70 million Catholic voters to stop a provision of President Barack Obama’s new heath car reform bill that will force Catholic schools, hospitals and charities to buy birth control pills, abortion-producing drugs and sterilization coverage for their employees.

“Never before, unprecedented in American history, for the federal government to line up against the Roman Catholic Church,” said Catholic League head Bill Donohue.

Already Archbishop Timothy Dolan has spoken out against the law and priests around the country have mobilized, reading letters from the pulpit. Donohue said Catholic officials will stop at nothing to put a stop to it.

“This is going to be fought out with lawsuits, with court decisions, and, dare I say it, maybe even in the streets,” Donohue said.

But pro-choice groups said they will fight the church and fight for the right of employees of Catholic institutions to have birth control and other services paid for.

“The Catholic hierarchy seems to be playing a cynical game of chicken and they don’t seem to care that the health and well being of millions of American woman are what’s at stake here,” National Abortion Rights Action League President Andrea Miller said.

Catholic leaders hope they will have more sway with the White House than usual because it is a presidential election year, hoping that if even a small percentage of Catholics back Obama’s opponent it could cost him the election.

When asked if this issue would affect who he would vote for in November, Wilton, Conn., resident Peter Taylor said, “Potentially, yes. I think it is a very serious issue, very meaningful.”

But not everyone views the situation as dire.

“I would certainly vote for Obama anyway. The church has to get up to date,” Manhattan resident Sue Thomas said.

Sources told Kramer that American bishops are contemplating a massive march on Washington, using people and school kids bused in from all over to protest the law.

SOURCE

10 Tips for Using Apple Cider Vinegar

10 Tips for Using Apple Cider Vinegar

Apple cider vinegar is my favorite new DIY household product. Just as baking soda has a huge range of uses from personal self-care to household cleaning, apple cider vinegar can do pretty much anything–for your skin, your hair, your house, and even your pets.

I learned about apple cider vinegar when I was researching ways to get rid of the fleas that had unfortunately begun cropping up in my apartment from my roommates’ two cats. Apple cider vinegar, apparently, when rubbed on the pet and added to the pet’s water, can greatly help repel the fleas from the animal.

Why should we all start using more apple cider vinegar? First of all, apple cider vinegar is a completely natural product: apple juice is fermented to hard apple cider, which is fermented a second time to apple cider vinegar. In integrating this natural product into our homes, we instantly decrease the consumption of unnatural chemicals in our daily lives.

Here are many other benefits of apple cider vinegar that can be applied to your lifestyle. Read the list below.

BEAUTY:

Hair: It is widely known that apple cider vinegar can be used as a rinse for your hair after shampooing to add healthy body and shine. Recycle an old shampoo bottle and fill it with 1/2 a tablespoon of apple cider vinegar and a cup of cold water. Pour through your hair after shampooing several times a week.

Face: Did you know that apple cider vinegar can help regulate the pH of your skin? Dilute apple cider vinegar with two parts water, and spread the concoction over your face with a cotton ball as a toner. You can do this at night after washing, and in the morning before you apply your moisturizer. You can also dab apple cider vinegar directly onto age spots and leave them on overnight to lighten their color.

Hands and Feet: Are your hands and feet feeling tired and swollen after a long day? Treat yourself to a personal spa massage by rubbing apple cider vinegar onto them.

Sunburn: Suffering from a bad sunburn? Add a cup of apple cider vinegar to your bath and soak for 10 minutes.

Teeth: Did you know that apple cider vinegar can help remove stains from teeth? Rub teeth directly with apple cider vinegar and rinse out.

Aftershave:
Fill a bottle with equal parts apple cider vinegar and water and shake to blend.

HEALTH:

Weight-Loss: For daily weight and pH balance maintenance, add 2 teaspoons of apple cider vinegar to 16 oz of water. Sip this concoction throughout the day.

Detox: Add 2 tablespoon of apple cider vinegar to a 1 or 2 liter filtered water bottle. Drink this throughout the day to cleanse your body and kidneys all day long.

HOME AND PETS

Cleaning: Mix 1/2 cup of apple cider vinegar with 1 cup water. You can use this concoction to clean microwaves, bathroom tiles, kitchen surfaces, windows, glasses and mirrors. This mixture also works as a disinfectant.

Flea Reduction: Rub apple cider vinegar onto your pet’s skin. Add a little bit of apple cider vinegar to their water. Spray apple cider vinegar, diluted 50 percent with water, onto your pets and onto your furniture to repel the presence of fleas.

Read more:SOURCE

Slash Your Risk of Stroke with Magnesium

Slash Your Risk of Stroke with Magnesium

Mike Barrett
NaturalSociety

A new study evaluating past research on magnesium adds to the evidence that a diet rich in magnesium leads to a lower stroke risk. But while magnesium-rich foods were shown to lead to a lower risk of stroke, the research didn’t determine whether a magnesium supplement would have the same effect or not. Unlike the proven use of yk 11 in muscle building, it’s not entirely known whether a supplement containing only magnesium would have the same effect as foods such as leafy vegetables, nuts, beans, and whole grains, which contain more nutrients and minerals than just magnesium.
Foods Rich in Magnesium Shown to Lower Stroke Risk

Researchers evaluated seven studies previously published over the span of 14 years. Approximately 250,000 people in the United States, Europe, and Asia were followed for 11.5 years on average, with 6,500 of them (3 percent) having had a stroke during the time they were followed. What the researchers noticed was that for every addition of 100 milligrams of magnesium a person consumed per day came a reduced risk of an ischemic stroke by 9 percent.

While magnesium has always been known to be a very powerful mineral in general, a study involving 3,713 postmenopausal women has shown that it also possesses amazing anti-inflammatory properties. Magnesium could be of great aid to those who wish to avoid the unreliable and dangerous effects of anti-inflammatory pharmaceuticals. It has also been found that magnesium can protect against diabetes.

A study led by Dr. Ka from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill has found a surprising relationship between magnesium and type 2 diabetes. The study discovered that individuals who ingested the highest amount of magnesium from foods and vitamin supplements slashed their risk of diabetes more so than those who consumed it in lower amounts.

Greens such as spinach are fantastic sources of magnesium, due to the fact that the middle of the chlorophyll molecule (which provides vegetables their color) contains magnesium. Some legumes (beans and peas), seeds and nuts, and whole, unrefined grains are also good sources of magnesium.

SOURCE

Measles virus may fight cancer cells

Measles virus may fight cancer cells

HALIFAX — A Dalhousie University medical school study indicates that cancer cells are much more susceptible to the measles virus than healthy cells.

Researchers found that the cells of many types of cancer, including breast, lung, colon and bladder, are lined with protein receptors that the measles virus can attach to.

Chris Richardson, who conducted the six-year research project with Ryan Noyce, said in an interview this week that the virus targets the cancer cells and grows inside them.

The results of their study were published recently in the online medical journal PLoS Pathogens.

The researchers plan to test the process on laboratory mice with the hope that clinical trials could begin on human patients in about 10 years.

The two researchers made the discovery last November after successfully infecting a cell with an engineered form of the virus in the laboratory.

“It was on a Sunday afternoon and through the microscope it was so blatant, it was very easy to see,” Richardson said. “The viruses lit up because we have a fluorescent virus.

“It glows in the dark … and the cells were all fluorescent. It was a beautiful picture.”

The long-term goal would be to derive a vaccine from the virus. This vaccine wouldn’t be preventative but could be used to treat cancer patients.

It would attack the tumour. Preferentially, it would start growing in the tumour,” Richardson said. “It would produce viral antigens in the tumour so that the immune system would recognize it as foreign and wipe the tumour out.”

Richardson and Noyce presented their results at the Mayo Clinic in the United States in July.

“There was a lot of interest there and (Mayo) researchers seem to be going in the same direction,
” Richardson said.

The use of viruses as anti-cancer agents isn’t new in this type of research. Another Dalhousie researcher, Patrick Lee, has used reoviruses, which are linked to respiratory diseases, to target cancer cells.

Ottawa researchers have been able to use a virus intravenously on cancer patients in that city.

This virus, a distant relative of smallpox, seemed to be particularly effective at searching for cancerous tumours, according to the study at the Ottawa Hospital Research Institute.

SOURCE

Gone…….and Forgotten

Retiree Benefits for the Military Could Face Cuts

Colin Hackley for The New York Times

Steve Griffin left the Army after five years and thus receives no pension. But he believes the system provides incentives for recruitment and rewards retirees who have endured great hardship.

Military pensions and health care for active and retired troops now cost the government about $100 billion a year, representing an expanding portion of both the Pentagon budget — about $700 billion a year, including war costs — and the national debt, which together finance the programs.

Making even incremental reductions to military benefits is typically a doomed political venture, given the public’s broad support for helping troops, the political potency of veterans groups and the fact that significant savings take years to appear.

But the intense push in Congress this year to reduce the debt and the possibility that the Pentagon might have to begin trimming core programs like weapons procurement, research, training and construction have suddenly made retiree benefits vulnerable, military officials and experts say.

And if Congress fails to adopt the deficit-reduction recommendations of a bipartisan joint Congressional committee this fall, the Defense Department will be required under debt ceiling legislation passed in August to find about $900 billion in savings over the coming decade. Cuts that deep will almost certainly entail reducing personnel benefits for active and retired troops, Pentagon officials and analysts say.

“We’ve got to put everything on the table,”
Defense Secretary Leon E. Panetta said recently on PBS, acknowledging that he was looking at proposals to rein in pension costs.

Under the current rules, service members who retire after 20 years are eligible for pensions that pay half their salaries for life, indexed for inflation, even if they leave at age 38. They are also eligible for lifetime health insurance through the military’s system, Tricare, at a small fraction of the cost of private insurance, prompting many working veterans to shun employer health plans in favor of military insurance.

Advocates of revamping the systems argue that they are not just fiscally untenable but also unfair.

The annual fee for Tricare Prime, an H.M.O.-like program for military retirees, is just $460 for families and has not risen in years, even as health care costs have skyrocketed. Critics of the system say the contribution could be raised substantially and still be far lower than what civilians pay for employer-sponsored health plans, typically about $4,000.

Those critics also argue that under the current rules, 83 percent of former service members receive no pension payments at all — because only veterans with 20 years of service are eligible. Those with 5 or even 15 years are not, even if they did multiple combat tours. Such a structure would be illegal in the private sector, and a company that tried it could be penalized, experts say.

“It cries out for some rationalization,
” said Sylvester J. Schieber, a former chairman of the Social Security Advisory Board. “Why should we ask somebody to sustain a system that’s unfair by any other measure in our society?”

But within military circles, and among many members of Congress, the benefits are considered untouchable. Veterans groups and military leaders argue that the system helps retain capable commissioned and noncommissioned officers.

And having volunteered to put their lives at risk, those people deserve higher-quality benefits, supporters argue. The typical beneficiary, they add, is not a general but a retired noncommissioned officer, with an average pension of about $26,000 a year.

“The whole reason military people are willing to pursue a career is because after 20, 30 years of extraordinary sacrifice, there is a package commensurate with that sacrifice upon leaving service,
” said Steven P. Strobridge, a retired Air Force colonel who is the director of government relations for the Military Officers Association of America, which is lobbying against changes to the benefits.

A wild-card factor in the debate is the withdrawal of American troops from Iraq and Afghanistan, which some experts say could avoid the stigma of cutting benefits while troops are at war.

“The fact that you are getting out of Iraq and Afghanistan does make it easier,
” said Lawrence J. Korb, a senior Pentagon official in the Reagan administration who was a co-author of a recent proposal for reducing the cost of military health care. “When the war in Iraq was in terrible shape, it was hard to get people to join the military, and no one wanted to touch any military benefits.”

By far the most contentious proposal circulating in Washington is from a Pentagon advisory panel, the Defense Business Board. It would make the military pension system, a defined benefit plan, more like a 401(k) plan under which the Pentagon would make contributions to a service member’s individual account; contributions by the troops themselves would be optional. Mr. Panetta has said that if adopted, the plan would not apply to current military personnel.

While health care costs for active and retired troops are growing faster, military pension costs are larger. Last year, for every dollar the Pentagon paid service members, it spent an additional $1.36 for its military retirees, a much smaller group. Even in the troubled world of state and municipal pension funds, pensions almost never cost more than payrolls.

The Cost of Military Pensions

Citing the fiscal hazards and inequities of the system, the Defense Business Board proposal would allow soldiers with less than 20 years of service to leave with a small nest egg, provided they served a minimum length of time, three to five years. But it would prevent all retirees from receiving benefits until they were 60.

The business board says that its proposal would reduce the plan’s total liabilities to $1.8 trillion by 2034, from the $2.7 trillion now projected — all without cutting benefits for current service members.

Steve Griffin of Tallahassee, Fla., is the type of soldier the defense board is trying to appeal to: a former captain who did two tours in Iraq, he left the Army in 2010 after five years of service and thus receives no pension.

Yet in a sign of the deep support for the existing system, Mr. Griffin says it should be left alone because it provides incentives for recruitment and rewards retirees who have endured great hardship.

“Yes, it would be nice for people like me,” Mr. Griffin, 28, said of the proposal. “But I think the retirement system now is fair. We shouldn’t take anything from it. If anything, we should add to it.”

Much like in the debate over Social Security, questions about the sustainability of the military pension system abound.

Each year the Defense and Treasury Departments set aside more than $75 billion to pay not only current and future benefits but also pensions for service many years in the past. But the retirement fund has not accumulated nearly enough money to cover its total costs, with assets of $278 billion at the end of 2009 and obligations of about $1.4 trillion.

The government tries to close the shortfall by simply issuing more Treasury securities each year, thereby adding to the nation’s debt.

Given the political potency of veterans groups, it is unclear whether anyone in Congress will lead an effort to revamp the pension or retiree health systems.

But the debt ceiling agreement approved this summer by Congress, under which the Pentagon must find $400 billion in reductions over the next 12 years, may force cuts once considered unthinkable. And if Congress does not adopt the recommendations of the bipartisan committee studying deficit reduction, the mandated reductions in Pentagon spending would more than double, to about $900 billion, and fall on just about every category of defense spending.

Deficit hawks, led by Senator Tom Coburn, Republican of Oklahoma, have begun taking smaller steps, pushing for an array of cuts to military benefits, including ending subsidies for base commissaries and tightening disability compensation for diseases linked to Agent Orange.

But those trims are considered marginal compared with the deeper reductions many experts say are necessary to contain Pentagon spending.

“If the trend continues, it will call into question the military’s ability to do other things, like buy equipment, do maintenance, train troops and equip them,”
said Nora Bensahel, a senior fellow at the Center for a New American Security, a nonprofit organization with ties to the Obama administration.

“At some point, the cost pressures by the retirement benefits will really start to impede military capabilities.”

SOURCE

Are you prepared?

Survivalists: Are you part of the new subculture?

Ali Meyer

MIDWEST CITY, Okla. — According to the most recent government data, food inflation costs for the average American family are about 4.5 percent per year. That staggering figure, coupled with growing fear about the global food trade and availability of fuel, is prompting a growing number of Oklahoma families to stock up.

This notion of “surivivalism” has been circling the American psyche for a few months now.

Glenn Beck is talking about it on his show and there are others.

The official guidelines from FEMA recommend two weeks of food immediately available for a family in case of emergency.

At Red Dawn: Hunting, Survival, Recreation, they specialize in homesteading, emergency preparedness and first-aid.

Owner Gaylon Cornsilk first dreamed up this concept about a year ago.

The doors have been open just six months and business has exploded.

Cornsilk says, “This was kinda born out of a passion to see people prepared for any kind of emergency, natural or man-made. We are growing exponentially everyday. Obviously there’s an air of people starting to notice and want to prepare for what’s going on around them.”

Donna Harper manages the store’s long-term storage food section.

Some of the pre-packaged emergency food rations last five to 25 years; the rations sell out so quickly they cannot keep enough on premises.

The average customer spends hundreds of dollars.

Harper says, “They’re buying a variety of this stuff. They don’t just want the survival tabs. They don’t just want the emergency rations. They want the dried fruit and soups and milk and eggs. We’re amazed. For the longest time we thought, ‘Oh it’s just us. There aren’t that many of us.’ But we’re finding out there are a lot of us. I don’t ever want to be sitting across the table from someone I love and thinking, ‘Why didn’t I prepare? I wish I had done more.’ I don’t ever want to do that.”

The Behringer family from Yukon is part of a new breed of survivalists.

Their garden supplies most of the family’s veggies in the summer; they freeze the rest.

They equipped their house with a built-in generator hook-up so they can keep the lights on when power fails.

Fred Behringer says, “I keep the generator full of gas and two gas cans right there with it because it’s no fun to get up at 2 a.m. because your generator went off and you need to go find some more gas.”

The Behringers’ secret is buying staples and buying bulk.

Andrea Behringer says, “I never thought of us as survivalists. It never even crossed my mind because it just seemed practical. We don’t have a lot of pre-made foods. It’s mostly staples. It’s your basics; beans, rice, pasta, potatoes, cans of vegetables. So if I can get a good deal on it, I will buy a whole bunch.

The Behringers say they could live comfortably for two weeks off what’s in the pantry. (Note: Two weeks of supplies can hardly be called preparation. 3 months is imperative along with a 1-3 day grab bag in case you need to leave in a hurry. To pick one up check awesome grab ‘n go’s here.

Whether you are stockpiling because you believe global economic meltdown is imminent or just because it is wise to buy a few extra when things are on sale, there are more and more Oklahomans choosing to load up on necessities, just in case.

Copyright © 2011, KFOR-TV

http://www.kfor.com/news/local/kfor-news-stock-piling-survivalists-story,0,2465713.story