Tag Archives: heart

CIA Cannibal Eats Dead Syrian Soldier’s Heart

CIA Cannibal Eats Dead Syrian Soldier’s Heart

Kurt Nimmo
Infowars.com

The CIA supported Free Syrian Army has produced a video showing Abu Sakkar eating the heart of a dead Syrian soldier.

Sakkar is the commander of the Farouq Brigades, one of the largest units of the Free Syrian Army. In 2012, the unit merged with the Syrian Islamic Liberation Front, a coalition of Muslim Brotherhood and Salafist groups vowing to create an Islamic state in Syria. It is named after Farouq from Omar bin al-Khatab, a companion of the Prophet Muhammad, and the second caliphate.

The video was described as authentic by several Abu Sakkar’s fighters and supporters, including his brother.

“I swear to God, soldiers of Bashar, you dogs – we will eat your heart and livers! Takbir! God is Great! Oh my heroes of Baba Amr, you slaughter the Alawites and take their hearts out to eat them!” Sakkar declares in the video.

The NGO Human Rights Watch claims the cannibal Sakkar also participated in the indiscriminate sheeling of Shia villages in Lebanon’s Bekaa Valley.

The International Committee of the Red Cross and the Geneva Convention prohibit mutilation of the dead. “Mutilation of the dead is actually a fairly rare occurrence in well-disciplined armies. This is probably as much the result of a general revulsion at such conduct as from a fear of criminal punishment,” notes H. Wayne Elliott.

The CIA’s Islamic mercenaries – supported and funded by the Gulf monarchies – have demonstrated on numerous occasions in Syria and Libya they are not beholden to international standards governing the conduct of war.

Amnesty International has documented a steep increase in war crimes committed by CIA supported mercenaries in Syria, including hostage taking, torture and summary executions.

In Libya, NATO’s mercenaries tortured and summarily executed thousands, including Muammar Gadhafi and his son, according to Human Rights Watch. Islamic militias are said to have killed U.S. ambassador Stevens and several other Americans in Benghazi.
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US teen invents advanced cancer test using Google

US teen invents advanced cancer test using Google

Fifteen-year-old high school student Jack Andraka likes to kayak and watch the US television show Glee.

And when time permits, he also likes to do advanced research in one of the most respected cancer laboratories in the world.

Jack Andraka has created a pancreatic cancer test that is 168 times faster and considerably cheaper than the gold standard in the field. He has applied for a patent for his test and is now carrying out further research at Johns Hopkins University in the US city of Baltimore.

And he did it by using Google.

The Maryland native, who won $75,000 at the Intel International Science and Engineering Fair in May for his creation, cites search engines and free online science papers as the tools that allowed him to create the test.

The BBC’s Matt Danzico sat down with the teenager, who said the idea came to him when he was “chilling out in biology class”.


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Oil Pulling Benefits – What is Oil Pulling, Anyway?

Oil Pulling Benefits – What is Oil Pulling, Anyway?

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Mike Barrett
NaturalSociety

What is Oil Pulling, Anyway?Most people are at least aware of the idea behind eating certain foods, exercising, and avoiding toxic chemicals to maintain overall health. Indeed, consuming powerful, health-boosting foods and avoiding unhealthy junk is a great way to stay healthy, but there are also some very specific techniques which can be utilized to achieve numerous health benefits. Among these techniques is a lesser known one called oil pulling. What is oil pulling, anyway – and what are the oil pulling benefits?

What is Oil Pulling, Anyway?

Used in ancient Ayurvedic medicine, oil pulling is an Indian remedy used primarily to enhance oral health and cleanse the body. Thankfully, the process of oil pulling is actually quite simple, harmless, and very inexpensive. Simply take one tablespoon of a pure, organic oil and swish it around in your mouth for 15-20 minutes. Move the oil around your mouth through sipping, sucking, and essentially pulling through your teeth. After rinsing, spit out the oil, thoroughly rinse your mouth out with water, and consume 2-3 glasses of water (purified if possible).

During this process, the oil mixes with the saliva, creating a thin, white liquid. Swishing activates the enzymes, and the enzymes draw toxins out of the blood. More specifically, lipids in the oil help to extract toxins from the saliva of the mouth. As you swish the oil around your mouth, teeth, gums, and tongue, the oil continues to absorb toxins while later turning thick and white. At this point, the oil becomes toxic; this is why spitting the oil out instead of swallowing it is an important last step, as you don’t want to reabsorb the toxins. While you can do this process anytime during the day, it is most beneficial upon rising, before eating or brushing your teeth.

While some individuals have had some success by using oils such as coconut and olive, the most popular and effective oils by far to use for oil pulling are sesame and sunflower.
Oil Pulling Benefits

As mentioned, the primary reasons for oil pulling is to remove bacteria, parasites and other toxins from your teeth and mucus membranes, and detoxify. One study showcases the oil pulling benefits on the oral level, where oil pulling with sesame oil was shown to reduce the amount of streptococcus mutants in both teeth plaque and mouth saliva, and boost overall health. Another study also shows how oil pulling can result in a significant reduction in total bacteria count.

As reported by Dr. Group of Global Healing Center, oil pulling benefits on an oral level also include:

Overall strengthening of the teeth and gums and jaws.
Prevention of diseases of the gums and mouth, such as cavities and gingivitis.
Prevention of overall tooth decay
Prevention for bad breath
Potential holistic remedy for bleeding gums
Prevention of dryness of the lips, mouth and throat.
Possible holistic treatment for TMJ and general soreness in the jaw area.

In addition to the benefits of oil pulling surrounding oral health, this ancient therapy also has a number of positive effects on the body.  There are many oil types that have amazing benefits in the health department, even the essential oil recipes for joint pain and inflammation are necessary to help without any chemical.  According to an article previously published on The Hindu Business Online (but seems to have been moved or removed), one doctor, Dr. F. Karsch, M.D., presented a paper to the All-Ukrainian Association outlining rather incredible possibilities oil pulling is capable of. Going by Dr. Karsch, oil pulling benefits can help with almost any illness or chronic condition, including:

Mouth & gum disease; stiff joints; allergies; asthma; high blood sugar; constipation; migraines; bronchitis; eczema; heart, kidney, lung diseases; leukemia; arthritis; meningitis; insomnia; menopause (hormonal issues); cancer; AIDS; chronic infections; varicose veins; high blood pressure; diabetes; cracked heels; acne, arthritis; bronchitis; dermatitis; sinusitis; and many more.

Whether you choose to use oil pulling to help treat other conditions or not, the benefits of oil pulling surrounding oral health and detoxification certainly make the therapy worthwhile.

Additional Sources:

Journal of Ayurveda and Integrative Medicine

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‘Zombie apocalypse’: Horror movie genre becomes twisted, real-life news headlines

‘Zombie apocalypse’: Horror movie genre becomes twisted, real-life news headlines

— First came Miami: the case of a naked man eating most of another man’s face. Then Texas: a mother accused of killing her newborn, eating part of his brain and biting off three of his toes. Then Maryland, a college student telling police he killed a man, then ate his heart and part of his brain.

It was different in New Jersey, where a man stabbed himself 50 times and threw bits of his own intestines at police. They pepper-sprayed him, but he was not easily subdued.

He was, people started saying, acting like a zombie. And the whole discussion just kept growing, becoming a topic that the Internet couldn’t seem to stop talking about.

The actual incidents are horrifying — and, if how people are talking about them is any indication, fascinating. In an America where zombie imagery is used to peddle everything from tools and weapons to garden gnomes, they all but beg the comparison.

Violence, we’re used to. Cannibalism and people who should fall down but don’t? That feels like something else entirely.

So many strange things have made headlines in recent days that The Daily Beast assembled a Google Map tracking “instances that may be the precursor to a zombie apocalypse.” And the federal agency that tracks diseases weighed in as well, insisting it had no evidence that any zombie-linked health crisis was unfolding.

The cases themselves are anything but funny. Each involved real people either suspected of committing unspeakable acts or having those acts visited upon them for reasons that have yet to be figured out. Maybe it’s nothing new, either; people do horrible things to each other on a daily basis.

But what, then, made search terms like “zombie apocalypse” trend day after day last week in multiple corners of the Internet, fueled by discussions and postings that were often framed as humor?

“They’ve heard of these zombie movies, and they make a joke about it,” says Lou Manza, a psychology professor at Lebanon Valley College in Pennsylvania, who learned about the whole thing at the breakfast table Friday morning when his 18-year-old son quipped that a “zombie apocalypse” was imminent.

Symbolic of both infection and evil, zombies are terrifying in a way that other horror-movie iconography isn’t, says Elizabeth Bird, an anthropologist at the University of South Florida.

Zombies, after all, look like us. But they aren’t. They are some baser form of us — slowly rotting and shambling along, intent on “surviving” and creating more of their kind, but with no emotional core, no conscience, no limits.

“Vampires have kind of a romantic appeal, but zombies are doomed,” Bird says. “Zombies can never really become human again. There’s no going back.

“That resonates in today’s world, with people feeling like we’re moving toward an ending,” she says. “Ultimately they are much more of a depressing figure.”

The “moving toward an ending” part is especially potent. For some, the news stories fuel a lurking fear that, ultimately, humanity is doomed.

Speculation varies. It could be a virus that escapes from some secret government lab, or one that mutates on its own. Or maybe it’ll be the result of a deliberate combination and weaponization of pathogens, parasites and disease.

It will, many believe, be something we’ve created — and therefore brought upon ourselves.

Zombies represent America’s fears of bioterrorism, a fear that strengthened after the 9/11 attacks, says Patrick Hamilton, an English professor at Misericordia University in Dallas, Pa., who studies how we process comic-book narratives.

Economic anxiety around the planet doesn’t help matters, either, with Greece, Italy and Spain edging closer to crisis every day. Consider some of the terms that those fears produce: zombie banks, zombie economies, zombie governments.

When people are unsettled about things beyond their control — be it the loss of a job, the high cost of housing or the depletion of a retirement account — they look to metaphors like the zombie.

“They’re mindless drones following basic needs to eat,” Hamilton says. “Those economic issues speak to our own lack of control.”

They’re also effective messengers. The Centers for Disease Control got in on the zombie action last year, using the “apocalypse” as the teaser for its emergency preparedness blog. It worked, attracting younger people who might not otherwise have read the agency’s guidance on planning evacuation routes and storing water and food.

On Friday, a different message emerged. Chatter had become so rampant that CDC spokesman David Daigle sent an email to the Huffington Post, answering questions about the possibility of the undead walking among us.

“CDC does not know of a virus or condition that would reanimate the dead,” he wrote, adding: “(or one that would present zombie-like symptoms.)”

Zombies have been around in our culture at least since Mary Shelley’s “Frankenstein” was published in 1818, though they really took off after George Romero’s nightmarish, black-and-white classic “Night of the Living Dead” hit the screen in 1968.

In the past several years, they have become both wildly popular and big business. Last fall, the financial website 24/7 Wall Street estimated that zombies pumped $5 billion into the U.S. economy.

“And if you think the financial tab has been high so far, by the end of 2012 the tab is going to be far larger,” the October report read.

It goes far beyond comic books, costumes and conventions.

—An Ace Hardware store in Nebraska features a “Zombie Preparedness Center” that includes bolts and fasteners for broken bones, glue and caulk for peeling skin, and deodorizers to freshen up decaying flesh. “Don’t be scared,” its website says. “Be prepared.”

—On uncrate.com, you can find everything you need to survive the apocalypse — zombie-driven or otherwise — in a single “bug-out bag.” The recommended components range from a Mossberg pump-action shotgun and a Cold Kukri machete to a titanium spork for spearing all the canned goods you’ll end up eating once all the fresh produce has vanished.

—For $175 on Amazon, you can purchase a Gnombie, a gored-out zombie garden gnome.

Maybe it’s that we joke about the things we fear. Laughter makes them manageable.

That’s why a comedy like “Zombieland,” with Woody Harrelson blasting away the undead on a roller coaster and Jesse Eisenberg stressing the importance of seatbelts is easier to watch than, say, the painful desperation and palpable apocalyptic fear of “28 Days Later” and “28 Weeks Later.”

The most compelling zombie stories, after all, are not about the undead. They’re about the living.

The popular AMC series “The Walking Dead” features zombies in all manner of settings. But the show is less about them and more about how far the small, battered band of humans will go to survive — whether they’ll retain the better part of themselves or become hardened and heartless.

It’s a familiar theme to George Romero, who told The Associated Press in 2008 that all of his zombie films have been about just that.

“The zombies, they could be anything,” he said. “They could be an avalanche, they could be a hurricane. It’s a disaster out there. The stories are about how people fail to respond in the proper way.”

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