Tag Archives: indianapolis

Mother kept baby in drawer, fed him cough syrup ‘like juice’

Police: Mother kept baby in drawer, fed him cough syrup ‘like juice’

A mother charged with murder and neglect in the death of her young child kept the 2-month-old boy in a drawer and gave him cough syrup in lieu of juice, court documents said.

More alarmingly, family members and neighbors believed Bambi Glazebrook, 29, Indianapolis, wasn’t feeding her son and told authorities—but no one took action.

On Thursday, Nov. 8, police arrived at a home in the 1200 block of Earhart in response to a 911 call about a child who wasn’t breathing. When officers got there, they found 2-month-old Phillip Robey unresponsive. The boy went to Riley Hospital for Children at IU Health, where doctors pronounced him dead on arrival.

Police interviewed Glazebrook, who told them the child seemed “fussy” about an hour before the 911 call. She said the baby “spent most of the day” in a drawer. When she checked on him at 2:30 p.m, she began to make a bottle. About a half-hour later, Glazebrook said, she changed his diaper and noticed his legs were stiff and he wasn’t breathing. She said she called 911 after waking up her father, Phillip Brahlek.

Investigators said Glazebrook’s account wasn’t true; the boy had been dead for several hours, court documents said.

Police described the conditions inside the home as “deplorable and unfit for human habitation.” They learned the baby was sleeping in a drawer located in an entertainment center in the living room. The victim was “grossly underweight and malnourished.”

Several family members said Glazebrook had a history of neglecting her children; three of her five children were adopted after Child Protective Services removed them from her home. One witness said she called CPS and police multiple times. The Department of Child Services, which oversees CPS, acknowledged receiving at least one recent complaint.

Police interviewed several witnesses who said they’d noticed the boy’s emaciated condition and a general sense of defensiveness from Glazebrook when questioned about Phillip’s health. One witness said she encountered Glazebrook and the child and was concerned because she “rubbed the back of the baby and all she felt were bones,” court documents said.

The witness also noticed dog feces on the floor of the home and described the residence as a disaster. The woman also told police Glazebrook kept the child in a drawer.

A neighbor and relative also noticed the baby’s poor condition and said something appeared to be wrong with Phillip. According to court documents, Glazebrook told her not to worry because she “would handle it.” The woman followed up a few weeks later, again expressing concern about the baby’s condition. Glazebrook told her to “mind her own business,” court documents said.

Another witness said Glazebrook rarely bathed or changed the diapers of Phillip and a 2 year old who lived in the home. That witness also said the mother gave her children liquid cough syrup to “make them go to sleep,” court documents said. Glazebrook dispensed the cough syrup “as if someone would give a child juice.”

The other child has been removed from the home.

An autopsy found that Phillip died from acute failure to thrive/starvation. He weighed less than six pounds and had “absolutely no” fat on his body.

Glazebrook is due in court Wednesday morning.

SOURCE

SchoolTeacher Helps Students Cheat BecauseThey’re ‘Dumb As Hell’

School: Teacher Helps Students Cheat Because She Says They’re ‘Dumb As Hell’

– A former fifth-grade teacher implicated in a cheating scandal reportedly gave students the illegal assistance because she thought they were “dumb as hell.”

According to the Atlanta Journal-Constitution, math teacher Shayla Smith was accused of offering students the answers to a test they were taking at the time. She had reportedly been responsible for supervising them while the tests were being completed.

Schajuan Jones, who taught a fourth-grade class across the hall from Smith’s former room, overheard her talking to another teacher about the test.

“The words were, ‘I had to give your kids, or your students, the answers because they’re dumb as hell,’” Jones was quoted as saying about the interaction between Smith and the unidentified third teacher.

A former student also allegedly accused Smith of cheating, adding that the educator offered the girl, now in eighth grade, the answers to a math test in 2010.

The tribunal deliberated for just one hour before handing down a guilty verdict. Smith had been charged with willful neglect and immorality, and she subsequently lost her job.

Smith’s case was part of a larger investigation that implicated approximately 180 public school teachers in the city, sparked by investigations performed by the newspaper.

All tests proctored by Smith were allegedly marked with suspicious erasure marks, amounting to what was termed a “practically impossible frequency of changes from wrong to right [answers].” SOURCE

Overcoming Obstacles


Overcoming Obstacles

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by Lou Stoops

Obstacles and hardships are common to us all, some more so than others. This simple observation leads to another; far too many of us are making excuses for the lack of success in the present, based upon the pain of the past.

While it may be true that some have had a particularly difficult life, it isn’t true that that predetermines failure. On the contrary, difficulties, hardships and major obstacles can become contributors to our success.

Some years ago, a study by Victor and Mildred Goertzel entitled, Cradles of Eminence, explored the childhood experience and home environment of 300 highly successful people. Their names are easily recognizable: Franklin D. Roosevelt, Helen Keller, Winston Churchill, Albert Schweitzer, Gandhi, Einstein and Freud.

These findings are fascinating and deserve to be noted next time we’re tempted to focus on our weaknesses or past pain in an attempt to rationalize failure. Consider the following:


Three-fourths of the children studied had to contend with poverty, overbearing parents, broken homes, or rejection.

Seventy-four of the eighty-five writers of fiction and drama, as well as sixteen of twenty poets came out of home situations where tension and dysfunction between parents was the norm.

Over one-fourth had to deal with physical handicaps such as deafness, blindness or crippled limbs.

So you see, obstacles and hardships don’t have to lead to failure. William A. Ward was right when he said, “Adversity causes some men to break; others to break records.

Biologists refer to this as “the adversity principle.” It seems that in their studies among plants and animals, well-being is not always an advantage to a species. Where there is no challenge, no obstacles or hardships, there is but limited growth and development. One recent survey discovered that 87% of the people questioned said “a painful event (death, illness, breakup, divorce, etc.) caused them to find a more positive meaning in life.

To become all that you can be, you must live in the present and stop making excuses. We will always have problems, but problems exist to be solved. Churchill once remarked, “Kites rise highest against the wind – not with it.” Don’t be afraid to fly!
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Lou Stoops is a pastor, teacher, keynote speaker, corporate trainer, life coach, workplace coach and business owner. He has served as a newspaper and web columnist, actor, television and radio personality. He holds undergraduate and graduate degrees in Theology and Christian Administration. He has achieved certification as a trainer in fatherhood programming with the National Center of Fathering; was accepted into and successfully completed a prestigious diversity program with the American Institute for Managing Diversity; is a certified trainer in “The Bridges Out Of Poverty” program with Aha Process; and is recognized as a Certified Training Consultant through the Center for Entrepreneurial Resources of Ball State University. He can be contacted at www.loustoops.com or [email protected]

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This Looks Like A Fortified Sniper’s Nest At The Super Bowl

This Looks Like A Fortified Sniper’s Nest At The Super Bowl

By Barry Petchesky

Some photos with no backstory are making the rounds, showing what appears to be an Indianapolis police sniper checking out his post in the rafters of Lucas Oil Stadium in the hours or days before the Super Bowl, a post that would be manned when the game began. Yes, we know there’s nothing surprising about trained marksmen working the biggest sporting event of the year. We also know it’s pretty damn cool to see what the Super Bowl snipers are working with.

It’s standard operating procedure to have an invisible law enforcement presence at any high-profile event, let alone one with the attendance and attention the Super Bowl receives. And remember, there are all kinds of politicians and other assorted rich people around. You never know what could happen, though the imagination conjures up increasingly insane and horrifying scenarios, and also the criminally underrated Black Sunday. It’s just never a bad idea to have a sniper rifle around.

It’s no secret that the Super Bowl is staffed by sharpshooters. “We’ve got a lot of places for snipers in here,” Jerry Jones enthused to CNN about Cowboys Stadium before last year’s Super Bowl. In 2009, Ashton Kutcher noticed (and filmed) a pair of them across the street.

We’re actively trying to figure out where these photos came from and for what purpose they were taken. They’ve started to circulate on Facebook, and we found them posted on a 4chan board, though it’s impossible to tell where they originated. But the details are right: the IMPD patch, the end zone design, the giant Roman numerals on the glass of Lucas Oil Stadium. So we’re labeling them “plausible” and will update when we can trace them back a little further.


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Mall giant Simon Property Group sues Indiana to tax Amazon.com sales

Mall giant sues Indiana to tax Amazon.com sales
APBy KEN KUSMER –

INDIANAPOLIS (AP) — Shopping mall giant Simon Property Group sued the Indiana Department of Revenue on Thursday to try to force it to collect taxes from Amazon.com Inc. for all sales made in the state.

The nation’s biggest mall operator, whose Indianapolis headquarters are across the street from the Statehouse, said it was not seeking monetary damages in the lawsuit filed in Marion County courts.

“This action is being filed to benefit all of Indiana’s taxpayers and the state’s bricks-and-mortar retailers,” Simon said in a statement.

Simon, which operates 27 Indiana shopping centers, said it requested the Revenue Department begin collecting sales taxes on sales made by Amazon.com within the state’s borders as required by state law.

Amazon operates three distribution warehouses in Indiana and announced in July it plans to open a fourth in the state.

“Amazon.com is required by Indiana law to collect and remit sales and use taxes to the state, for sales made over the Internet, but has consistently refused to do so even though it is required by current Indiana laws …” Simon said. “Main Street retailers are being harmed by this unequal playing field in Indiana and their existence is being jeopardized and threatens the employment of hundreds of thousands of retail employees in our state.”

The state levies a 7 percent sales tax on most goods, giving online retailers a sizable advantage.

Revenue Department spokesman Bob Dittmer said the agency had not seen the lawsuit and had no immediate comment.

An influential lawmaker, state Sen. Luke Kenley, R-Noblesville, said last month he would approach other members of the General Assembly on the need to apply the state sales tax to online retailers. He estimated taxing online sales could net the state up to $400 million annually and would put online retailers on the same playing field as traditional merchants.

A 1992 Supreme Court ruling effectively bars states from collecting taxes from most online operations. Kenley is president of the national group lobbying Congress to change the law.

A message seeking comment was left Thursday on a media telephone line at Seattle-based Amazon.com. Amazon spokeswoman Mary Osako said last month the company believed “the sales tax issue needs to be solved at the federal level.”

Not ONLY in America

Young black men make up four in 10 of youth jail population

Report shows proportion of black and minority ethnic young men in young offender institutions in England and Wales has risen

Alan Travis,

Young black men now account for nearly 40% of the population of youth jails in England and Wales, according to a report by the chief inspector of prisons.

The report, published jointly with the youth justice board, shows that the proportion of black and other minority ethnic young men in young offender institutions (YOIs) has risen from 23% in 2006 and 33% in 2009/10 to 39% last year.

The changing demographic profile of the population inside youth jails in England and Wales also shows an increasing proportion of young Muslims, up from 13% last year to 16% this year. Foreign national young men account for a record 6% of the population.

The chief inspector of prisons, Nick Hardwick, says young people aged 15 to 18 are being held in deteroriating conditions in the YOI network, with fewer feeling safe while they are locked up.

The inspection showed that fewer young inmates felt they could tell someone they were being victimised or believed a member of staff would take them seriously. Only half said they had done something while they were inside that would make them less likely to reoffend in the future.

The report also reveals that more that one-third of the young men had been physically restrained as part of the disciplinary process at their YOI. The highest restraint rate – 66% – was at the Keppel unit at Wetherby, which deals with male teenagers who have not responded to a “normal” YOI regime. The lowest – 8% – was at the Carlford unit near Woodbridge, Suffolk, which holds 30 teenage boys serving long sentences.

The over-representation of young black men in youth jails comes despite a sharp fall in the number of children and young people in custody that has already led to the closure of five YOIs, including a specialist unit for young women.

The total population of the youth justice “secure estate”, which includes eight male YOIs and three specialist units for girls and young women, continued to fall from 1,977 in March 2010 to 1,822 this March, before this summer’s riots.

Hardwick says, however, that the number of black and minority ethnic children in custody has not fallen at the same rate as the number of white children being locked up.

Between 2007 and 2011 there was a 37% reduction in white children in custody, compared with a 16% reduction in black and ethnic minority children,” says the report.

The report does not discuss the reasons why young black people make up an ever greater proportion of the shrinking youth jail population. But Hardwick does note that an increasing number – 53% now, compared with 39% last year – of young men are being sent to prison for the first time.

Hardwick said: “This report has highlighted some deterioration in children and young people’s experience of custody. Despite the falling numbers, this population has well-defined vulnerability and increasing numbers within minority groups. The need, therefore, to provide these people with support during their time in custody and in preparation for their release is as great as ever.”

Frances Done, the chair of the youth justice board, which commissions places in youth prisons, said it would be working with all secure establishments to make sure that young people’s time in custody has positive results.

The inspection was based on the experience of 1,115 young men and 47 young women in YOIs and specialist units.

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