Tag Archives: SWAT

SWAT Cop Attracts Ridicule After He’s Pictured with His Rifle Sight on Backwards

SWAT Cop Attracts Ridicule After He’s Pictured with His Rifle Sight on Backwards

SWAT COP WITH SITE ON BACKWARDS

(DAILY MAIL) A SWAT team in upstate New York is being mocked as an example of the difference between military and police training after an officer was captured peering through a backwards sight on his combat rifle.


As users on the military Reddit were quick to point out when the image was posted, the reverse sight makes it effectively useless.

Users mocked the SWAT officers training and some went so far as to question the motives of some of the men serving in local law enforcement.

The officer is using a ‘military style’ assault weapon with a close quarters combat sight that costs roughly $500.

‘It’s disturbing to think that 1) none of his buddies corrected it, and 2) he’s in a real-life situation with his optic on backwards, which means he’s never fired that rifle with the optic on it, which means it isn’t zeroed and he thought it was OK to show up to a gunfight with an unzeroed weapon,’ wrote one Reddit user.SOURCE

The $4,000 Bulletproof Polo Shirt

The $4,000 Bulletproof Polo Shirt

By TANIA KARAS

The Aim:

For the man who lives dangerously — but still wants to look devil-may-care — Colombian designer Miguel Caballero offers a polo shirt with a little something shirtextra up its sleeve: It’s bulletproof. The 4-pound shirt’s antiballistic panels promise to shield the wearer from a range of weaponry, though a version designed to withstand an Uzi costs a bit more than the one made to fend off a 9mm (prices range from $3,000 to $4,000 a shirt). The company, which calls itself the “Armani of bulletproof clothing,” says its clothes are proven to work. In fact, most of its employees have been shot at while wearing the garments — it’s part of the orientation process. Don’t worry. A spokesperson assures us there have been no work-related casualties.

The Reality:

No doubt even those in the highest-risk professions appreciate casual Fridays, but experts say Caballero wearers are paying dearly for the sartorial flair: Other companies sell vests offering the same level of protection for less than a third of the price. Plus, we can’t help but wonder, who wants to spend weekends kicking back in a 4-pound T-shirt? (Caballero says bodyguards, heads of state and other VIPs are its primary market.) The most extravagant t-shirts the guys I know will buy are customs from https://ragetees.co.uk, which is hardly Armani, then again, none of them are at risk of being shot at, usually. Still, even though the company’s website declares, “Yes, it’s bulletproof,” there is a fine distinction here. The National Institute of Justice, which rates body-armor products, actually approves it for protection against some firearms — but not heavy-duty guns like rifles or AK-47s. A company general manager says, “Bullet-resistant is more accurate.”

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Nurse kidnapped Baby Keegan after gunning down her mother at a Doctors appointment

Nurse Kidnapped Baby Keegan After Miscarriage
PHOTO: Law enforcement officers enter an apartment near the scene where a mother was killed and her baby, Keegan Schuchardt,

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By COLLEEN CURRY, GINA SUNSERI, and YUNJI DE NIES (@yunjid)

The nurse who killed a young Texas mother and kidnapped her 3-day-old baby told police she needed the infant to show to her fiance, whom she had misled into believing she had recently given birth to his child.

In a press conference this afternoon, police provided more details of the kidnapping and murder. They said that the suspect, Verna Deann McClain, 30, contacted them Tuesday afternoon as officers frantically searched for 3-day-old Keegan Schuchardt, who was kidnapped after his mother, Kayla Golden, was gunned down outside of a pediatrician’s office. Police had put out an Amber Alert for the child, asking the public to report any sightings of McClain’s vehicle to authorities.

McClain contacted police to say she was affiliated with the vehicle being sought but had nothing to do with the crimes. Her story “fell apart” while investigators interviewed her, according to Montgomery County Sheriff Captain Bruce Zenor. McClain then confessed to killing Golden, 28, and snatching baby Keegan.

Montgomery County D.A.

Golden was shot dead and then run over in the parking lot of the doctor’s office where she was taking Keegan for a check-up. Police said that they believe McClain acted alone, pulling up in a Lexus SUV next to Golden’s car before shooting her, putting the infant in her car, and then hitting Golden with the SUV on the way out of the parking lot.

“My baby, my baby!” Golden reportedly screamed as her infant boy was taken from his car seat.

McClain is charged with capital murder and is being held without bail in a solitary jail cell.

Zenor said during a press conference today that McClain kidnapped the baby because she had told her fiance that she had given birth recently to his child, when in reality she had suffered a miscarriage. She was set to marry the man in May, and felt she needed a baby to show him, Zenor said.
PHOTO: Law enforcement officers enter an apartment near the scene where a mother was killed and her baby, Keegan Schuchardt, inset, kidnapped, April 17, 2012, in Spring, Texas.
Montgomery County Sheriff’s Office/AP
Law enforcement officers enter an apartment… View Full Size
Texas Mother Killed, Newborn Stolen: Nurse Charged Watch Video
Texas Mother Killed, Newborn Stolen: Arrest Made Watch Video
Newborn Kidnapped After Mom Shot Dead Watch Video

Police said they believe Golden was a random target, and that McClain had been familiar with the pediatrician’s office from taking her own children there. McClain has three children.

Police said that from the moment witnesses called to report a woman shot in the parking lot in Spring, Texas, multiple law enforcement agencies raced to find baby Keegan. Two detectives spotted a vehicle matching the description of the one in the incident in a nearby apartment complex and entered McClain’s home, but found it empty.

McClain later showed up at her apartment, and told police that the baby was at the apartment of her sister, in a neighboring county. A SWAT team in that county found Keegan alive six hours after the kidnapping.

Police said McClain has expressed remorse for the killing.

Keegan is now with a relative, police said. They would not comment on why the child is not being released to his father.

Golden’s other two children are in a “safe place,” according to her mother, Linda Golden, though she would not specify where. It was unclear whether Keith Schuchardt is the father of Golden’s other children, ages 4 and 19 months.

Schuchardt told ABC News he held Keegan last night when the infant was found.

“It was wonderful. It was nice to know he’s still alive,” he said today. “[Golden] was the best girl I’ve ever been with. She’s just good for the kids, good with the kids. She helped me out through a lot of stuff.”

Golden’s mother, Linda Golden, said the tragedy has devastated her family and Keith Schuchardt.

“Her husband is devastated. We don’t know what we’re going to do. They loved each other very much, they really were just so sweet to each other,” she said. “Me and her were really really close, we went everywhere together, did everything together. She was my only daughter. I don’t know what I’m going to do.”

Linda Golden said her daughter did not know her murderer, and was unlikely to fight with or disagree with anyone.

“She would never fight with anybody or argue with anybody, she was such a sweet person. They say this lady wanted a baby real bad, was a registered nurse, and just picked out my daughter and killed her,” Golden said. “She would never fight with anybody, but she was fighting for her baby, and got killed.”

Witnesses said the mom fought to keep the baby from the kidnappers, but ended up in the parking lot with gunshot wounds.

“She was laying on the ground. She wasn’t moving for nothing,” witness Joshua Jesson told ABC station KTRK in Houston. “But then I saw a blue Lexus drive off in that direction.”

“The child was being put into the suspect vehicle and that’s when the mother tried to get into the car,” Lt. Dan Norris with the Montgomery County Sheriff’s Office said. “The car sped away, knocking the lady to the ground.”

An affidavit obtained by ABC News from the Montgomery County police states that McClain admitted to shooting Golden and taking the baby.

According to the affidavit, McClain’s sister, Corina Jackson, had recently said that her sister would be adopting a baby soon. After she allegedly killed Golden and stole her newborn, McClain stated to her sister that she now had the child. McClain has three children ages 16, 10 and 6.

“There were statements that were made by Ms. McClain that led us to believe this was an intentional act on her part, not that Ms. Golden was targeted specifically, but that this was part of a plan to kidnap a child,” Ligon said.

McClain, a mother of three, made her first appearance in magistrate court this morning. According to the Montgomery County district attorney’s office, she was charged with capital murder early this morning.

“She’s given a full statement to the detectives with the Montgomery County Sheriff’s Department,” the district attorney, Brett Ligon, said today on “Good Morning America.” “As part of the statement with that agency, in conjunction with the other evidence that we were able to obtain yesterday…we did charge her [McClain] in the early hours of this morning with capital murder.”

Though witnesses from the scene of the crime had told authorities there were two people in the car, police today said they are convinced that McClain had acted alone.

SOURCE

This Looks Like A Fortified Sniper’s Nest At The Super Bowl

This Looks Like A Fortified Sniper’s Nest At The Super Bowl

By Barry Petchesky

Some photos with no backstory are making the rounds, showing what appears to be an Indianapolis police sniper checking out his post in the rafters of Lucas Oil Stadium in the hours or days before the Super Bowl, a post that would be manned when the game began. Yes, we know there’s nothing surprising about trained marksmen working the biggest sporting event of the year. We also know it’s pretty damn cool to see what the Super Bowl snipers are working with.

It’s standard operating procedure to have an invisible law enforcement presence at any high-profile event, let alone one with the attendance and attention the Super Bowl receives. And remember, there are all kinds of politicians and other assorted rich people around. You never know what could happen, though the imagination conjures up increasingly insane and horrifying scenarios, and also the criminally underrated Black Sunday. It’s just never a bad idea to have a sniper rifle around.

It’s no secret that the Super Bowl is staffed by sharpshooters. “We’ve got a lot of places for snipers in here,” Jerry Jones enthused to CNN about Cowboys Stadium before last year’s Super Bowl. In 2009, Ashton Kutcher noticed (and filmed) a pair of them across the street.

We’re actively trying to figure out where these photos came from and for what purpose they were taken. They’ve started to circulate on Facebook, and we found them posted on a 4chan board, though it’s impossible to tell where they originated. But the details are right: the IMPD patch, the end zone design, the giant Roman numerals on the glass of Lucas Oil Stadium. So we’re labeling them “plausible” and will update when we can trace them back a little further.


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Killer Cops Aren’t Heroes: We Need Police Who Think Like Firefighters, Not Like Soldiers in a War Zone

Killer Cops Aren’t Heroes: We Need Police Who Think Like Firefighters, Not Like Soldiers in a War Zone

Dave Lindorff

The tragic slaying of troubled eighth-grader Jaime Gonzalez in Brownsville, Texas by trigger-happy local police illustrates the sad an dangerous state we have arrived at as we turn our local police forces into SWAT team soldiers up-armed with assault rifles, black facemasks and stun grenades.

The reason Gonzalez, who had no hostages and was just armed with a pellet gun, was killed by police bullets was because the primary concern of the officers confronting him was to eliminate the threat to themselves, not to rescue a troubled kid.

To analyze this situation, we need to step back and consider firefighters, that other group of uniformed public employees (or often volunteers!) who also have to rescue people and whom we simply expect to face life-and-death situations on our behalf. As my cousin, a retired urban police officer, once pointed out to me, police don’t face anywhere near the risk that firefighters face. As he explained, police officers in truth rarely face life-and-death situations on the job, and when they do, they generally have the upper hand, given their guns and their training. Firefighters, on the other hand, know that they could die every time they respond to an alarm.

When a firefighter arrives at a burning building, her or his first thought is whether there might be someone trapped inside, or unconscious inside from smoke inhalation. If there is any possibility that this might be the case, they just rush into the burning building, obviously as safely as possible, but always aware that the whole thing could come down on them at any moment.

a firefighter going into a wall of flame to rescue someone or an up-armed SWAT kill team in their armored car?Who is the hero: a firefighter going into a wall of flame to rescue someone or an up-armed SWAT kill team in their armored car?

I’ve actually witnessed this kind of selfless heroism. When I lived in a large apartment building in New York City, years ago, there was a fire in another apartment several floors down. The building was considered “fire proof,” in that each unit was all surrounded by concrete–the walls, the ceilings and the floors — so theoretically the fire in this apartment, which was sending angry flames and smoke billowing out of the windows, could have safely been allowed to burn itself out. But instead, what I saw when I went down to the hall that the apartment was on, was two NYFD firefighters rush up the stairs and walk up to the door, which was so hot the paint was blistering out on it like melting lava. Then, incredibly, without even stopping to cross themselves or say a little silent prayer, they just kicked in the door. As the flames rushed out towards them, to my astonishment, they just walked into the inferno!

I talked to one of them afterwards. As it turns out there was nobody in the apartment, but he said they had rushed in right away because they were concerned that someone might have been trapped inside.

Now that is selfless heroism, yet they just saw it as all in a day’s work.

If they had been acting like many police officers, these guys would have waited outside in the hall, while fire trucks outside sprayed water through the window to quell the flames. Of course, had someone been in the flat, that person would have been toast had the firemen waited outside until things were safer and the fire was under control before going inside.

The parallel situation is young Jaime with his pellet gun in the hall of the Brownsville middle school. The cops had all the cards in this incident: they were marksmen, they had body armor, and there were several of them. The kid was clearly not a marksman, was carrying a pistol which is a notoriously hard thing to hit a target with, would have no time to aim if he tried to take a shot at a cop, and would in any case have had to manage a head shot to do any serious damage. Furthermore, the police were in no hurry. Since Gonzales had no hostage, since the doors to the classrooms were in lockdown so he couldn’t rush into one and take a hostage or shoot someone, and since the halls had been cleared, there was plenty of time to try to talk him down.

But the cops, clearly, were not there to save a young kid from himself, as a firefighter would have been doing. They were there thinking, first and foremost, of how to protect themselves. And so they took the easy route and shot and killed a boy. End of problem.

That is what is wrong with our police in America. Of course there are good, heroic cops, but as a group they are trained and encouraged not to be selfless public servants, but to see themselves as soldiers in a war on crime. Everything in public policy works towards this end: the provision of billions of dollars’ worth of deadly military equipment to police departments, the glorification of cops who shoot and kill perps, the caving in to police unions by politicians who fail to establish serious civilian review boards empowered to monitor police violence, the unwillingness of prosecutors and courts to punish cops who do use excessive violence, and of course the media glorification of police brutality and police violence, both in the news and in Hollywood.

Instead of urban commandos, we need in America police who see their job as saving lives, including the lives of those who are mentally unbalanced. We need police who are trained to see all people and all lives as precious. We need police who seek out the job of cop because they want to help people, not because they were in the military and have experience with handling weapons and thus have an advantage in the hiring process. We don’t need domestic soldiers as police. We need people who think like firefighters.

If our firefighters thought and acted like our nation’s police, there would be a lot more people burning to death or dying of smoke inhalation as the firefighters, protecting themselves, just stood back and watched buildings burn down.

The thugs we have been witnessing enthusiastically beating up peaceful protesters of the Occupy Movement around the country, and merrily spraying them with pepper spray and teargas, are the same people who would shoot a troubled kid instead of trying to save him (and by the way, how come cops are so quick to deploy their nonlethal weapons, including rubber bullets, bean-bag guns and flash-bang grenades, against peaceful protesters, and then they don’t use them when they could have saved a troubled kid and instead turn to their sidearms and M-4s?) . These people are not heroes, they are not civil servants, and they do not belong in a police uniform. We need a wholesale revamping of the nation’s police departments to convert them from urban combat units to protectors of lives, promoters of social harmony and defenders of liberty and democracy.

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Mystery company buying up U.S. gun manufacturers

Mystery company buying up U.S. gun manufacturers

Natasha Singer

Lined up in a gun rack beneath mounted deer heads is a Bushmaster Carbon 15, a matte-black semiautomatic rifle that looks as if it belongs to a SWAT team. On another rack rests a Teflon-coated Prairie Panther from DPMS Firearms, a supplier to the U.S. Border Patrol and security agencies in Iraq. On a third is a Remington 750 Woodsmaster, a popular hunting rifle.

The variety of rifles and shotguns on sale here at Cabela’s, the national sporting goods chain, is a testament to America’s enduring gun culture. But, to a surprising degree, it is also a testament to something else: Wall Street deal-making.

In recent years, many top-selling brands – including the 195-year-old Remington Arms, as well as Bushmaster Firearms and DPMS, leading makers of military-style semiautomatics – have quietly passed into the hands of a single private company. It is called the Freedom Group – and it is the most powerful and mysterious force in the U.S. commercial gun industry today.

Never heard of it?

You’re not alone. Even within gun circles, the Freedom Group is something of an enigma. Its rise has been so swift that it has become the subject of wild speculation and grassy-knoll conspiracy theories. In the realm of consumer rifles and shotguns – long guns, in the trade – it is unrivaled in its size and reach. By its own count, the Freedom Group sold 1.2 million long guns and 2.6 billion rounds of ammunition in the 12 months ended March 2010, the most recent year for which figures are publicly available.

Behind this giant is Cerberus Capital Management, the private investment company that first came to widespread attention when it acquired Chrysler in 2007. (Chrysler later had to be rescued by taxpayers). With far less fanfare, Cerberus, through the Freedom Group, has been buying big names in guns and ammo.

From its headquarters in Manhattan, Cerberus has assembled a remarkable arsenal. It began with Bushmaster, which until recently was based here in Maine. Unlike military counterparts like automatic M-16s, rifles like those from Bushmaster don’t spray bullets with one trigger pull. But, with gas-powered mechanisms, semiautomatics can fire rapid follow-up shots as fast as the trigger can be squeezed. They are often called “black guns” because of their color. The police tied a Bushmaster XM15 rifle to shootings in the Washington sniper case in 2002.

After Bushmaster, the Freedom Group moved in on Remington, which traces its history to the days of flintlocks and today is supplying M24 sniper rifles to the government of Afghanistan and making handguns for the first time in decades. The group has also acquired Marlin Firearms, which turned out a special model for Annie Oakley, as well as Dakota Arms, a maker of high-end big-game rifles. It has bought DPMS Firearms, another maker of semiautomatic, military-style rifles, as well as manufacturers of ammunition and tactical clothing.

“We believe our scale and product breadth are unmatched within the industry,” the Freedom Group said in a filing last year with the Securities and Exchange Commission.

Some gun enthusiasts have claimed that the power behind the company is actually George Soros, the hedge-fund billionaire and liberal activist. Soros, these people have warned, is buying U.S. gun companies so he can dismantle the industry, Second Amendment be damned.

The chatter grew so loud that the National Rifle Association issued a statement in October denying the rumors.

“NRA has had contact with officials from Cerberus and Freedom Group for some time,” the NRA assured its members. “The owners and investors involved are strong supporters of the Second Amendment and are avid hunters and shooters.”

Soros isn’t behind the Freedom Group, but, ultimately, another financier is: Stephen Feinberg, the chief executive of Cerberus.

Cerberus is part of one of the signature Wall Street businesses of the past decade: private equity. Buyout kings like Feinberg, 51, try to acquire undervalued companies, often with borrowed money, fix them up and either take them public or sell at a profit to someone else.

Before the financial crisis of 2008, scores of well-known U.S. companies, from Chrysler down, passed into the hands of private-equity firms. For the financiers, the rewards were often enormous. But some companies that they acquired later ran into trouble, in part because they were burdened with debt from the takeovers.

Feinberg, a Princeton graduate who began his Wall Street career at Drexel Burnham Lambert, the junk bond powerhouse of Michael Milken fame, got into private equity in 1992. That year, he and William Richter founded Cerberus, which takes its name from the three-headed dog in Greek mythology that guards the gates of Hades.

Today, Feinberg presides over a private empire that rivals some of the mightiest public companies in the land. Cerberus manages more than $20 billion in capital. Together, the companies it owns generate annual revenue of about $40 billion – more than either Amazon or Coca-Cola last year.

Why Cerberus went after gun companies isn’t clear. Many private investment firms shy away from such industries to avoid scaring off big investors like pension funds.

Yet, in many ways, the move is classic Cerberus. Feinberg has a history of investing in companies that other people may not want, but that Cerberus believes it can turn around. When Cerberus embarked on its acquisition spree in guns, it essentially had the field to itself.

“There’s much less competition for buying these companies,”
says Steven N. Kaplan, a professor at the University of Chicago Booth School of Business and a private equity expert. “They must have decided there is an opportunity to make money by investing in the firearms industry and trying to build a big company.”

Whatever the reason, Cerberus, through the Freedom Group, is now a major player.

It has sold weapons to the governments of Afghanistan, Thailand, Mexico and Malaysia, among others, and obtained new business from the U.S. Army, including a contract worth up to $28.2 million to upgrade the M24 sniper weapon system.

Cerberus brings connections to the table. The longtime chairman of its global investments group is Dan Quayle, the former vice president. The Freedom Group, meantime, has added two retired generals to its board. One is George Joulwan, who retired from the Army after serving as Supreme Allied Commander of Europe. The other is Michael Hagee, formerly commandant of the Marine Corps.

Jessica Kallam, a spokeswoman at the Freedom Group, said executives there declined to comment for this article. Timothy Price, a managing director of Cerberus, also declined to comment.

The old Bushmaster factory in Windham, Maine, doesn’t look like much. With a facade of brick and gray aluminum siding, it squats in an unassuming office park on the Roosevelt Trail.

But Cerberus representatives who arrived here in 2005 clearly saw potential. Inside, several dozen gunsmiths, working by hand, were fitting together 6,000 to 7,000 weapons a month. At the time, Bushmaster was thriving, although it had been stung by bad publicity stemming from the Beltway sniper shootings. (In a 2004 settlement with victims of the shootings and their families, Bull’s Eye Shooter Supply, the store where the gun was acquired, agreed to pay $2 million, and Bushmaster agreed to pay $568,000, but they did not admit liability.)

Richard Dyke, then the principal owner and chairman of Bushmaster, welcomed the visitors from New York. A blunt-spoken Korean War veteran and Republican fundraiser, he had made a fortune himself by buying companies in trouble, including one that made poker chips. In 1976, he bought a bankrupt gun-maker in Bangor, Maine, for $241,000, moved it to Windham and later changed its name to Bushmaster. The company that Dyke bought had patents on semiautomatic weapons designed for the military and police. But he was drawn to the nascent market in military-style firearms for civilians. He saw as his customers precision target shooters, including current and former military personnel, police officers and, well, military wannabes, he says.

A Bushmaster Carbon 15 .223 semiautomatic is about 3 feet long. But, weighing in at just under 6 pounds, it is surprisingly easy to maneuver, even for a novice. It doesn’t have to be recocked after it’s fired: You just squeeze the trigger over and over.

“At 25 meters, if you are a decent shot,”
Dyke says, “you can put it into a bull’s-eye that is the size of a quarter.

The Bushmaster brand began to grow in the 1980s after the company started supplying its semiautomatics to police departments. It won a much larger consumer following in the 1990s, after it landed several small military contracts.

Bushmaster was among the first to sell ordinary people on weapons that look and feel like the ones carried by soldiers. Today many gunmakers have embraced military-style weapons, a major but controversial source of growth for the commercial gun market, says Tom Diaz, a senior policy analyst at the Violence Policy Center, a research group that backs gun control.

“It’s clear that the militarized stuff is the stuff that sells and is defining the industry,”
Diaz says.

Dyke says he’s not sure why Bushmaster caught the eye of Cerberus. Whatever the case, when Cerberus came calling, Dyke, then past 70, was ready to sell. At the time, Bushmaster had $85 million in annual sales and several million dollars in debt, he says. In April 2006, he sold the company to Cerberus for about $76 million, he says, and Cerberus rented the Bushmaster plant here for five years.

The next year, Cerberus formed the Freedom Group.

Now Bushmaster is gone from Maine. Earlier this year, Dyke says, the Freedom Group notified him it was closing Bushmaster’s operation in the state and moving it to a bigger plant owned by Remington, a typical consolidation play for a private investment firm looking to cut costs and increase efficiency. Remington, for its part, announced earlier this year that it was expanding its manufacturing capacity and hiring new employees to make Bushmasters.

Several months ago, Dyke started a new company, Windham Weaponry, at the old Bushmaster site and has rehired most of his former employees. But he’s not planning to go head-to-head with the Freedom Group.

“It’s the big gorilla in the room,
” he says, adding: “We don’t have to do $100 million. We’d have hopes of doing $20 million.”

Remington has been producing guns since 1816, when, according to lore, a young man named Eliphalet Remington made a flintlock rifle in his father’s forge in Ilion Gulch, in upstate New York. By the 1870s, the brand was so popular that the company diversified into typewriters. In 2007, the Freedom Group swooped in and bought Remington for $370 million, including $252 million in assumed debt. In one stroke, the Freedom Group gained one of the most famous names in U.S. firearms, the largest domestic maker of shotguns and rifles and a major manufacturer of ammunition.

“That caused a lot of stir in the industry,” says Dean J. Lockwood, a weapons systems analyst at Forecast International, a market research firm.

Next, the Freedom Group in rapid succession went after other firearms companies: DPMS; Marlin Firearms, a classic maker that came with two niche shotgun brands, Harrington & Richardson and L.C. Smith; and Dakota Arms. The Freedom Group also bought S&K industries, which supplies wood and laminate for gun stocks, as well as the Advanced Armament Corp., which makes silencers. It acquired Barnes Bullets, which makes copper-jacketed bullets popular with precision shooters and police departments.

The more the company diversifies its portfolio, analysts say, the more it has to offer to firearms distributors and leading retailers like Wal-Mart and Cabela’s.

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