Tag Archives: teen

Teen Pens Hilariously Scathing Open Letter After She Didn’t Get Into Her Top Schools: ‘To (All) the Colleges That Rejected Me’

Teen Pens Hilariously Scathing Open Letter After She Didn’t Get Into Her Top Schools: ‘To (All) the Colleges That Rejected Me’

Madeleine Morgenstern

To (All) the Colleges That Rejected Me: Teens Hilariously Scathing Open Letter After She Didnt Get Into Her Top Schools

In her view, Suzy Lee Weiss did everything right.

The Pittsburgh high school senior has a 4.5 GPA, scored 2120 on her SATs and worked as a page in the U.S. Senate.

Still, she didn’t get accepted to any of her top colleges, including Princeton, Yale or the University of Pennsylvania.

So she took to the Wall Street Journal to vent her frustrations, penning an acid-tongued (and she says satirical) open letter to the schools that rejected her. In the line of fire: diversity (she has as much “as a saltine cracker”) and even her mom and dad, who “gave up on parenting” their youngest daughter and left her with “a dearth of hobbies that make admissions committees salivate.”

Weiss wrote:

Colleges tell you, “Just be yourself.” That is great advice, as long as yourself has nine extracurriculars, six leadership positions, three varsity sports, killer SAT scores and two moms. Then by all means, be yourself! If you work at a local pizza shop and are the slowest person on the cross-country team, consider taking your business elsewhere.

What could I have done differently over the past years?

For starters, had I known two years ago what I know now, I would have gladly worn a headdress to school. Show me to any closet, and I would’ve happily come out of it. “Diversity!” I offer about as much diversity as a saltine cracker. If it were up to me, I would’ve been any of the diversities: Navajo, Pacific Islander, anything. Sen. Elizabeth Warren, I salute you and your 1/32 Cherokee heritage.

[…]

Having a tiger mom helps, too. As the youngest of four daughters, I noticed long ago that my parents gave up on parenting me. It has been great in certain ways: Instead of “Be home by 11,” it’s “Don’t wake us up when you come through the door, we’re trying to sleep.” But my parents also left me with a dearth of hobbies that make admissions committees salivate. I’ve never sat down at a piano, never plucked a violin. Karate lasted about a week and the swim team didn’t last past the first lap. Why couldn’t Amy Chua have adopted me as one of her cubs?

Then there was summer camp. I should’ve done what I knew was best—go to Africa, scoop up some suffering child, take a few pictures, and write my essays about how spending that afternoon with Kinto changed my life. Because everyone knows that if you don’t have anything difficult going on in your own life, you should just hop on a plane so you’re able to talk about what other people have to deal with.

Her letter, published a week ago, prompted a storm of online commentary, with one person calling her “an entitled little brat” but others applauding her for speaking the truth about the college admissions process.

Weiss said it was all in fun, and that she wrote the letter after her mother grew tired of hearing her moan and complain about the rejections.

“It’s a satire. That’s the point. Just like ’30 Rock’ is a satire, which pokes fun at things that are politically correct. That’s what I was trying to do,” she said Thursday on NBC’s “Today.”

And she said diversity itself is a good thing, but that it’s perhaps given too much weight.

“In this day and age, we’re being judged on things we cannot control, as opposed to things that we can,” she said. “It’s such a rat race nowadays days and it’s such a business model as opposed to who’s most qualified should get in. It’s a crap-shoot and I understand that.”

Weiss said she’s gotten job and internship offers since the letter was published, and did receive acceptances to plenty of other schools as well, including the University of Michigan, Indiana and Penn State.

She said she’s still undecided about which she’ll choose.

READ LETTER HERESOURCE

US teen invents advanced cancer test using Google

US teen invents advanced cancer test using Google

Fifteen-year-old high school student Jack Andraka likes to kayak and watch the US television show Glee.

And when time permits, he also likes to do advanced research in one of the most respected cancer laboratories in the world.

Jack Andraka has created a pancreatic cancer test that is 168 times faster and considerably cheaper than the gold standard in the field. He has applied for a patent for his test and is now carrying out further research at Johns Hopkins University in the US city of Baltimore.

And he did it by using Google.

The Maryland native, who won $75,000 at the Intel International Science and Engineering Fair in May for his creation, cites search engines and free online science papers as the tools that allowed him to create the test.

The BBC’s Matt Danzico sat down with the teenager, who said the idea came to him when he was “chilling out in biology class”.


Read More
SOURCE

A shock tactic gone too far? New ad features senior citizens simulating sex positions to promote use of condoms

A shock tactic gone too far? New ad features senior citizens simulating sex positions to promote use of condoms
By Kristie Lau

Custom Search

An advertisement featuring senior citizens simulating sexual acts has sparked shock from consumers.

Too much? An ad campaign showing senior citizens in a series of different sexual positions has sparked shock among consumers


Visual impact: Though the seniors featured in the video are fully-clothed, the sexual nature of the positions is impossible to ignore

The video campaign, released by U.S. organisation SaferSex4Seniors.org, is designed to promote safe sex through use of condoms following news that STDs among sexually-active seniors in Florida had risen by 71per cent over the past five years.

But many believe the group, while promoting a worthy cause, has taken shock tactics too far.

The 30-second video, released on YouTube today, shows a group of elderly men and women mocking the performance of fellatio as well as other challenging sexual positions.

In one scene, a particularly strong man is holding a woman who is standing upside down on her elbows. Deadpan expressions are shown on their faces.

But Akila Gibbs, the executive director of the Pasadena Senior Center told Wsbt.com that he believes the ad detracts attention from the campaign’s cause.

He said: ‘I think it looks like they’re making fun of seniors, more than they’re educating them.’

Safer Sex For Seniors, aims to provide ‘accurate, up-to-date information from experts in the field’.

It is formed of an independent collective of professional sexuality educators, researchers, authors, trainers, counselors, and therapists and provides fact sheets and advice via its website

Gothamist.com added: ‘Nobody wants to think about – let alone picture – their Grandma doing it.’

Randy Matheson, a Canadian media blogger, was shocked by the footage.
He wrote on his blog: ‘While I can only hope that no hips were ‘dislodged’ in the making of this PSA featuring spry senior couples acting out positions from the Kama Sutra, I cramped up just watching the video.’
Twitter has drawn the comments of further shocked consumers.


High risk: The ad highlights the fact that the rate of STDs among sexually active seniors has risen by over 70per cent in the last five years

DDB, the New York-based advertising agency which produced the video has defended its campaign, describing it as a ‘strategic choice to use humor and shock value’.
A spokesman told Gothamist.com: ‘Rather than taking a negative approach that uses scare tactics and piles on statistics to deter unsafe sex, DDB made the strategic choice to use humor and shock value.

Powerful message: The payoff reads, ‘While there are many ways to do it… There’s only one way to do it safely

Safety firstThe makers of the ad want seniors to enjoy their sex lives responsibly

‘Whether the younger generation likes it or not, our grandparents are having sex.

‘We wanted to make a sexy ad that maintains a level of tastefulness and encourages seniors to enjoy their sex lives – safely.’

.

Read more:SOURCE

Young people are now so addicted to their mobile phones it feels like they have lost a limb when they are without them!

The young generation are ‘addicted’ to mobile phones
Young people are now so addicted to their mobile phones it feels like they have lost a limb when they are without them, a study finds.

By Richard Alleyne, Science Correspondent 5:30AM BST 19 Apr 2011

Some said they feel so bereft without their iPhone or Blackberry that it evokes similar feelings to the “phantom limb” syndrome suffered by amputees.

The findings, by the University of Maryland, show the growing reliance that the younger generation has on technology and how it has become central to their lives.

While phones were the most essential device, other technology such as computers, MP3 players and televisions were also considered essential to get people through their day.

Many young people reported mental and physical symptoms of distress and “employed the rhetoric of addiction, dependency and depression,” when reporting their experiences of trying to go unplugged for a full day.

“Students talked about how scary it was, how addicted they were,” said Professor Susan Moeller, who led the project.

“They expected the frustration. But they didn’t expect to have the psychological effects, to be lonely, to be panicked, the anxiety, literally heart palpitations.”

The study titled “The World Unplugged project” asked more than 1,000 students from 10 countries around the world, including Britain, to go without any media for 24 hours and monitored their feelings.

Prof Moeller said that more than 50 per cent of students failed to go the full 24 hours and everyone claimed to suffer some kind of withdrawal symptoms.

Ryan Blondino, a student at the University of Maryland who participated, compared the experience of going without digital technology to missing a limb.

“I felt something very similar to a phantom limb, only it would be like phantom cellphone,” he said.

“I still felt like my phone was vibrating and I was receiving messages even though I didn’t have it on me.”

A student from the UK said: “Media is my drug. Without it I was lost. I am an addict.”

The study found few differences in the way students used and relied on digital technology in different countries, despite those countries’ huge differences in economic development, culture and political governance.

It concludes that most college students, whether in developed or developing countries, are strikingly similar in how they use media – and how ‘addicted’ they are to it.

They all used virtually the same words to describe their reactions, including: Fretful, Confused, Anxious, Irritable, Insecure, Nervous, Restless, Crazy, Addicted, Panicked, Jealous, Angry, Lonely, Dependent, Depressed, Jittery and Paranoid.

In effect, cell phones have become this generation’s security blanket.”

The report was published by the International Center for Media & the Public Agenda.

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/technology/8458786/The-young-generation-are-addicted-to-mobile-phones.html